Sensory nerves


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Related to Sensory nerves: Sensory nervous system, Motor nerves

Sensory nerves

Sensory or afferent nerves carry impulses of sensation from the periphery or outward parts of the body to the brain. Sensations include feelings, impressions, and awareness of the state of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensory action potential (SAP) parameters were measured (Neurocare 2000 EMG machine, Biotech Ltd, Mumbai), bilaterally in four major sensory nerves, at a fixed stimulation recording distance of 14 cm.
Certain drugs, such as carbamazepine, can interfere with the passage of nerve impulses along sensory nerves and these can be very effective.
This receptor, which sits on the surface of some sensory nerve cells, first drew public attention when researchers learned that it responds to both high temperatures and capsaicin, the substance that makes certain peppers taste hot (SN: 11/8/97, p.
In support of that claim, he and colleagues will describe in the March Nature Neuroscience how the actions of multiple, unspecified ion channels allow sensory nerve cells to react to coldness.
A recent study by the same research group found that airway sensory nerves called C-fiber nerves were activated with the temperature within the chest was elevated to about 102 degrees Fahrenheit.
Tooth to ear region A toothache may be felt in the ear because the same sensory nerve supplies both parts.
The researchers hypothesised that sensory nerves were involved after observing that anaesthesia prevented the late asthmatic response in mice and rats.
Breakthrough pain may arise because tumors give off chemicals that cause sensory nerves to perceive normal stimuli as harmful, Mantyh says.
About neuropathic pain Neuropathic pain is a form of chronic pain that stems from injuries to the sensory nerves, often associated with diabetes and inflammatory injuries.
Five years ago, Bautista showed that allyl isothiocyanate, the sinus-clearing ingredient in wasabi, hot mustard and garlic, causes pain solely by activating a receptor called TRPA1 on sensory nerves.
Since balance relies on information relayed by sensory nerves, they decided to evaluate their 6-year-olds using a "postural-sway force platform.