Sensory nerves


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Related to Sensory nerves: Sensory nervous system, Motor nerves

Sensory nerves

Sensory or afferent nerves carry impulses of sensation from the periphery or outward parts of the body to the brain. Sensations include feelings, impressions, and awareness of the state of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
motor nerve conduction and F-wave studies for the median and ulnar motor nerves, and ulnar sensory nerve conduction studies with the neutral, flexion, and extension maneuvers).
We hypothesized that sensory nerve conduction velocities (SNCVs) of the wing would remain unchanged after brachial plexus nerve block but that the cord dorsum potential (CDP) would decrease, thereby indicating decreased sensory nerve conduction through the brachial plexus.
1) Herophilus apparently believed that 'psychic pneuma' was formed in the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles (out of 'natural pneuma') from where it permeated through to the 4th ventricle (command centre) and activated all nerve action (there being a 'sensory pneuma' for sensory nerves, and 'motor pneuma' for motor nerves).
Motor and sensory nerve conduction studies of the peroneal, posterior tibial, and sural nerves and the posterior tibial F-responses were normal in both lower extremities (Table 2).
He said that stem cells from the sensory nerves could be regrown in the damaged area.
Studies of sensory nerves from mice genetically engineered to lack the protein may resolve its roles, he adds.
the cervical branch to the platysma; there are interconnections between the facial nerve and primarily the sensory nerves, including the trigeminal, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and cervical nerves (3)
The team was able to attach one of the tongue's two sensory nerves and both motor nerves.
Researchers at Keio University's medical school say they have succeeded in regenerating severed peripheral nerves in rats, potentially paving the way for more effective treatment of neurological disabilities associated with the loss of the sensory nerves through accidents or surgeries.
After a person has chicken pox, the virus remains dormant in the body's sensory nerves near the spinal cord.
Offering a non-narcotic way to tackle pain with the use of mild electrical impulses, they stimulate minor sensory nerves which lie close to the surface of the skin, blocking out the "messages" that your nervous system sends to the brain.
The impulses stimulate minor sensory nerves close to the surface of the skin, blocking the messages your nervous system sends to the brain when you are in pain.