sensory

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sensory

 [sen´sŏ-re]
pertaining to sensation or to the response of the senses (hearing, sight, touch, etc.) to incoming stimuli.

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏ-rē),
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

sensory

/sen·so·ry/ (sen´sor-e) pertaining to sensation.

sensory

(sĕn′sə-rē)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the senses or sensation.
2. Transmitting impulses from sense organs to nerve centers; afferent.

sensory

[sen′sərē]
Etymology: L, sentire to feel
1 pertaining to sensation.
2 pertaining to a part or all of the body's sensory nerve network.

aphasia

Dysphasia Neurology Partial or total inability to understand or create speech, writing, or language due to damage to the brain's speech centers; loss of a previously possessed facility of language comprehension or production unexplained by sensory or motor defects or diffuse cerebral dysfunction Etiology Stroke, brain disease, injury; anomia–nominal or amnesic aphasia and impaired ability to communicate by writing-agraphia are usually present in all forms of aphasia. See Broca's/Motor aphasia, Sensory/Wernicke's aphasia, Tactile aphasia.
Aphasia
Motor
Broca's aphasiaA primary deficit in language output or speech production, which ranges in severity from the mildest, cortical dysarthria, characterized by intact comprehension and ability to write, to a complete inability to communicate by lingual, phonetic, or manual activity
Sensory
Wernicke's aphasiaPts with sensory aphasia are voluble, gesticulate, and totally unaware of the total incoherency of their speech patterns; the words are nonsubstantive, malformed, inappropriate–paraphasia Sensory aphasia is characterized by 2 elements: Impaired speech comprehension–due largely to an inability to differentiate spoken and written phonemes–word elements-due to either involvement of the auditory association areas or separation from the 1º auditory complex Fluently articulated but paraphasic speech, which confirms the major role played by the auditory region in regulating language
Total
Global aphasia, complete aphasiaA form of aphasia caused by lesions that destroy significant amounts of brain tissue, eg occlusion of the middle cerebral or left internal carotid arteries, or tumors, hemorrhage, or other lesions; total aphasia is characterized by virtually complete impairment of speech and recognition thereof; afflicted Pts cannot read, write, or repeat what is said to them; although they may understand simple words or phrases, rapid fatigue and verbal and motor perseverence, they fail to carry out simple commands; total aphasia of vascular origin is almost invariably accompanied by right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia, hemianopia of varying intensity
.

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏr-ē)
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

Sensory

Refers to peripheral nerves that transmit information from the senses to the brain.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy

sensory,

adj pertaining to the senses (smelling, tasting, touching, hearing, or seeing).

sen·so·ry

(sen'sŏr-ē)
Relating to sensation.
[L. sensorius, fr. sensus, sense]

sensory

pertaining to sensation.

equine sensory ataxia
see enzootic equine incoordination.
sensory input
produced by sensory organs and transmitted by afferent nerve fibers to the central nervous system. See also sense.
sensory nerve
a peripheral nerve that conducts impulses from a sense organ to the spinal cord or brain; called also afferent nerve. See also nerve.
sensory neuropathy
see hereditary sensory neuropathy.
sensory paralytic urinary bladder
see atonic neurogenic urinary bladder.
sensory perceptivity
the ability to perceive, to feel. Tests for this in animals are based on the assumption that the observer can differentiate between a reflex response and a central perception.
sensory receptor
see sensory receptor.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 shows the regions corresponding to the sensory innervation of each of the nerves of the foot.
Together, these branches and branches of cranial nerves IX and X provide sensory innervation to the external auditory canal.
1981), sensory innervation (Govind and Pearce, 1988), and vascularization (Guchardi and Govind, 1990) occur later.
Sensory innervation of the pharyngeal orifice of the eustachian tube is complex and is predominantly supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve.
The lack of any withdrawal reflexes in the exopodite suggests that the exopodites lack sensory innervation, but this requires further investigation.
The external branch runs along the lateral surface of the middle and inferior constrictor, provides the motor innervation for the two bellies of the CT, perforates the cricothyroid membrane, and assures the sensory innervation of the anterior subglottic region.
Retention of natural teeth for overdentures preserves some of the sensory input from periodontal receptors which are more precise than that obtained from the oral mucosa and the Sensory innervations is important components of mastication.
The palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve branches off before the median nerve enters the carpal tunnel, and it provides sensory innervations of the thenar region; therefore, it is not affected by CTS (4).
Lumbar sciatic pain presents itself clinically as low back pain radiating to the lateral part of the leg, following the path of the sciatic sensory innervations.
4-6] Therefore, any surgery that directly involves the sensory innervations in the upper lip, teeth, and alveolar region could be expected to have adverse consequences on speech.