feedback

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feedback

 [fēd´bak]
the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.

This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
Physiologic example of negative feedback. From Applegate, 2000.
alpha feedback alpha biofeedback.

feed·back

(fēd'bak),
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; for example, regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.

feedback

/feed·back/ (fēd´bak) the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process; feedback is negative when the return exerts an inhibitory control, positive when it exerts a stimulatory effect.

feedback

(fēd′băk′)
n.
1.
a. The return of a portion of the output of a process or system to the input, especially when used to maintain performance or to control a system or process.
b. The portion of the output so returned.
c. Sound created when a transducer, such as a microphone or the pickup of an electric guitar, picks up sound from a speaker connected to an amplifier and regenerates it back through the amplifier.
2. The return of information about the result of a process or activity; evaluative response: asked the students for feedback on the new curriculum.
3. The process by which a system, often biological or ecological, is modulated, controlled, or changed by the product, output, or response it produces.

feedback

Etymology: AS, faedan + baec
, (in communication theory)
1 information produced by a receiver and perceived by a sender that informs the sender of the receiver's reaction to the message. Feedback is a cyclic part of the process of communication that regulates and modifies the content of messages.
2 the return of some of the output so as to exert some control in the process.

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism (e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat).
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback

A feature of biological and other control systems in which some of the information from the output is returned to the input to exert either a potentiating effect (positive feedback) or a dampening and regularizing effect (negative feedback). Too much positive feedback produces a runaway effect often with oscillation.

feedback

regulatory mechanisms in which the outcome of system activity governs the amount of further output from the system; e.g. modulation of motor activity by sensory stimuli triggered by muscle contractions

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback,

n the constant flow of sensory information back to the brain. When feedback mechanisms are deficient because of sensory deprivation, motor function becomes distorted, aberrant, and uncoordinated.

feedback

the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process.
Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.
This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Restoring natural sensory feedback in real-time bidirectional hand prostheses.
The highly specialized tissues of the soft palate that control its complex motor activity and sensory feedback make it a difficult structure to duplicate.
incorporated sensory feedback, they did not provide experimental evidence of the use of that feedback other than in control of the action of the prosthesis [19].
Provide sensory feedback (sounds, colors, lights, etc.
The automotive world is changing rapidly, with consumers expecting a greater range of connected in-vehicle services, such as enhanced sensory feedback, real-time information access and superior entertainment capabilities - from video to applications," said Dean Miles, senior vice president, Automotive, Symphony Teleca.
SPARC is primarily focused on autonomic nervous system control of, and sensory feedback from, internal organs, but interests may extend beyond these to other organs that show promise for development of neuromodulation therapies.
At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AS) in Boston, Micera reports the results of previous work conducting a four-week clinical trial that improved sensory feedback in amputees by using intraneural electrodes implanted into the median and ulnar nerves.
Unencumbered by wires or cables in a 360-degree virtual environment, trainees experience realistic sensory feedback as they interact with live people or avatars.
Incorporating a sensory feedback system in advanced hand prostheses may overcome such difficulties and improve their usefulness [2-4].
Skechers GOrun is an innovative new minimalistic lightweight running line featuring revolutionary mid-foot strike technology and GOimpulse sensors for enhanced sensory feedback.
These experiments revealed that the movement of the treadmill created sensory feedback that initiated walking: the spinal brain took over, and walking essentially occurred without any input from the rat's actual brain.
One of the most critical developments in creating a full mechanical limb is using sensory feedback to close the loop in control," said Dr.