feedback

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feedback

 [fēd´bak]
the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.

This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
Physiologic example of negative feedback. From Applegate, 2000.
alpha feedback alpha biofeedback.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

feed·back

(fēd'bak),
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; for example, regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

feedback

(fēd′băk′)
n.
1.
a. The return of a portion of the output of a process or system to the input, especially when used to maintain performance or to control a system or process.
b. The portion of the output so returned.
c. Sound created when a transducer, such as a microphone or the pickup of an electric guitar, picks up sound from a speaker connected to an amplifier and regenerates it back through the amplifier.
2. The return of information about the result of a process or activity; evaluative response: asked the students for feedback on the new curriculum.
3. The process by which a system, often biological or ecological, is modulated, controlled, or changed by the product, output, or response it produces.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism (e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat).
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

feedback

A feature of biological and other control systems in which some of the information from the output is returned to the input to exert either a potentiating effect (positive feedback) or a dampening and regularizing effect (negative feedback). Too much positive feedback produces a runaway effect often with oscillation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Our suggest that wearing insole may increasing plantar sensory feedback but the efficacy of insoles remains unclear kinematic parameters in gait cycle.
Sensory feedback was provided via a vibratory stimulus using vibrotactile motors [9].
E Last but not least, Fragrance-Zip, also part of Zip- Pack's Sensory Feedback Fasteners portfolio, is a zipper closure that emits a customized aroma whenever the flexible resealable package is opened and closed.The scent is embedded in the reclosure during the manufacturing process.
Featuring performance characteristics that appeal to a consumer's sense of sound, sight, smell or touch is the Semus Sensory Feedback Fastener lankily of resealable closures.
Sensory tricking has proven successful in cases of dystonia because it alters the sensory feedback going to the brain, which makes it easier to create the new neural pathways.
[it] can independently interpret sensory feedback and direct the extremities to balance and move with minimal involvement from the brain," Edgerton says in a press release.
The patient, Dennis Aabo Sorensen, described the sensory feedback as "amazing".
But I think there's a strong argument to be made that they will not be clinically viable until the sensory feedback is incorporated."
Even though these studies on underwater simulation aim to increase reality of the simulation by increasing the autonomy of virtual underwater environments and providing simple sensory feedback, in terms of sensory perception elements, they are still limited to audiovisual effects.
The developed test bench therefore provides a high flexibility in implementing real time closed-loop control scenarios that could generate important insights about the various aspects of artificial sensory feedback in prosthetics.
Surgeons, engineers, therapists, and prosthetists from the US explain basic scientific concepts and key principles behind recording signals from peripheral nerves and providing sensory feedback to the prosthesis user; surgical approaches to transhumeral and shoulder disarticulation amputations; the role of TMR in the prevention and treatment of end-neuromas; and the principles of rehabilitation, prosthetic fitting, and occupation therapy.
But balance also depends on visual input from our eyes, sensory feedback via the feet, and general steadiness supported by strong, healthy muscles and joints.