time sense

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time sense

the faculty by which the passage of time is appreciated.

time sense

The ability to detect differences in time intervals.
See also: sense
References in classic literature ?
Minute after minute passed unnoted; he had lost his sense of time. He sought with a terrible earnestness a solution of the mystery, but sought in vain.
Levin lost all sense of time, and could not have told whether it was late or early now.
How long this might have gone on I do not know, for they seemed to have no sense of time: but at last the captain of the ship, who seemed near beside himself (and no great wonder) in the midst of this crying and confusion, came to the side and begged us to depart.
I know now that the battle in the hall was a very brief affair; while it lasted I had no sense of time; minutes or moments, they were (God forgive me!) some of the very happiest in all my life.
The hall clock striking two recalled them to the sense of time.
He had no sense of time, and was so full of adventures that all I have told you about him is only a halfpenny-worth of them.
All sense of time is lost in the monotony of ex- pectation, of hope, and of desire--which is only one: Get the ship to the southward!
With so well-trained a hand and eye, such perfect adroitness and practice in every art which could promote neatness and comfort, and keep out of sight every disagreeable incident of sickness,--with such a perfect sense of time, such a clear, untroubled head, such exact accuracy in remembering every prescription and direction of the doctors,-- she was everything to him.
The season starts with the world premiere of Didy Veldman's Sense of Time - the third commission in Birmingham Royal Ballet's Ballet Now initiative.
That Filipinos are always late or have a skewed sense of time has become an accepted fact, though not necessarily true or a good value to emulate.
However, this inspired premise is crushed beneath the wheels of the misfiring storytelling which has clanking dialogue and no sense of time or distance while the comedy and romance barely register.
This is an Augustinian sense of memory essential to the visio Dei and it is intriguing to consider further what influence Augustine may have had directly or indirectly on this particular sense of time's fullness--as well as how the absorption of Aristotle's corpus may have mutated this sense.