sensation

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sensation

 [sen-sa´shun]
an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium.
girdle sensation zonesthesia.
gnostic s's sensations perceived by the more recently developed senses, such as those of light touch and the epicritic sensibility to muscle, joint, and tendon vibrations.
primary sensation that resulting immediately and directly from application of a stimulus.
referred sensation (reflex sensation) one felt elsewhere than at the site of application of a stimulus.
subjective sensation one originating with the organism and not occurring in response to an external stimulus.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn),
A feeling; the translation into consciousness of the effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation

/sen·sa·tion/ (sen-sa´shun) an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium.
girdle sensation  zonesthesia.
referred sensation , reflex sensation one felt elsewhere than at the site of application of a stimulus.
subjective sensation  one perceptible only to the subject, and not connected with any object external to the body.

sensation

(sĕn-sā′shən)
n.
a. A perception associated with stimulation of a sense organ or with a specific body condition: the sensation of heat; a visual sensation.
b. The faculty to feel or perceive; physical sensibility: The patient has very little sensation left in the right leg.
c. An indefinite generalized body feeling: a sensation of lightness.

sensation

[sensā′shən]
Etymology: L, sentire, to feel
1 a feeling, impression, or awareness of a body state or condition that results from the stimulation of a sensory receptor site and transmission of the nerve impulse along an afferent fiber to the brain. Kinds of sensation include delayed sensation, epigastric sensation, primary sensation, referred sensation, and subjective sensation.
2 a feeling or an awareness of a mental or emotional state, which may or may not result in response to an external stimulus.
enlarge picture
Pathways of sensation

sensation

Homeopathy
A general term for the quality of a symptom; for example, a pain can be burning, throbbing, tearing and so on.

Mainstream medicine
The conscious recognition of a physical (audio, chemical, electrical, mechanical, visual) stimulation that excites a sense organ.

Psychology
The mental and emotional experience associated with a sound, light or other simple stimulus, and the initial information-processing steps by which sense organs and neural pathways receive stimulus information from the environment.

sensation

Mainstream medicine The conscious recognition of a physical–audio, chemical, electrical, mechanical, visual stimulation which excites a sense organ. See Epicritic sensation.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn)
A feeling; the translation into consciousness of the effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation

The conscious experience produced by the stimulation of any sense organ such as the eye, ear, nose, tongue, skin, or any internal sensory receptor.

sensation

central nervous system translation of incoming sensory stimuli into conscious awareness

sensation 

The conscious response to the effect of a stimulus exciting any sense organ. See perception.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn)
A feeling; translation into consciousness of effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation (sensā´shən),

n an impression conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium commune.
sensation, psychologic effects of,
n an arousal, facilitation, and distortion of sensation by psychologic factors, the basis for which lies in the corticalization of the special senses.
sensation, referred,
n a group of vaguely classified sensations that are a consequence of cortical experience. They are the sensory hallucinations,
paresthesias, and the phenomenon called
phantom limb. Nonspecific and poorly localized pain in the alveolar ridges, which have poor vascular supply, may be evidence of this phantom limb phenomenon associated with neurotic behavior.
sensation, specialized,
n a sensation that is perceived by the specialized end organs associated with special senses such as vision, hearing, and smell.

sensation

an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium. Includes cold, distention, hunger, itch, pain, taste of various kinds, thermal, thirst, tickle, touch, warmth and some psychological and emotional experiences which animals obviously experience but cannot describe. See also sense.

sensation disturbance
cutaneous sensation errors include paresthesia, hyperesthesia, anesthesia. See also blindness, deafness.

Patient discussion about sensation

Q. What causes a warm sensation in your foot I have a warm sensation at sole of left foot lasting 5-10 second From time to time I get a warm sensation at the sole of my foot lasting about 5-10 seconds. Started about 2 months ago.

A. Frankly? Although it's tempting to try to give you diagnosis here, these kinds of complaints are so varied and can point to so many different directions I would refrain from doing it. In my opinion you should see a doctor. It's impossible to give a diagnosis based on one line. Sorry...

More discussions about sensation
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore all test vehicles have the booming sensation at difference speed with different booming sensations.
Human thermal sensation and comfort are important topics in the design and operation of occupied spaces.
However, previous research findings and the author's observation suggest that pathological Internet users are heterogeneous who act very differently online, who perceived the Internet differently, and who may be more sensation seeking or disinherited than normal users.
Critique: The newest addition to the outstanding 'Imagery and Human Development' series from Baywood Press, "On the Evolution of Conscious Sensation, Conscious Imagination, and Consciousness of Self" is an erudite and thought-provoking treatise that will be of special interest to students of psychology, philosophy, cognitive science, and neuroscience.
Zuckerman's theory 1970 Zuckerman defines sensation as "a trait defined by the seeking of varied, novel, complex, and intense sensations and experiences, and the willingness to take physical, social, legal, and financial risks for the sake of such experience".
Sensation seeking reflects the desire for new and exciting personal experiences in the physical, mental, and social domains (Zuckerman, 1990; Zuckerman, Bone, Neary, Mangelsdorff, & Brustman, 1972).
Washington, Jan 1 (ANI): Other than five basic tastes that include sweet, sour, bitter, salty and umami, humans may also have a sixth taste sensation, researchers say.
UK pear growers will soon be in a position to tap into the premium market for Sweet Sensation pears - the pear market's equivalent to Pink Lady apples - for the first time.
In past activation research, a great deal is known about the relations between message sensation value and sensation-seeking on outcome measures such as attention, arousal, fear, and behavior intention (Donohew, Palmgreen, & Duncan, 1980; Everett & Palmgreen, 1995; Lorch et al.
Hovis say that each Seed Sensations loaf is packed full of flavours that promise to transform any sandwich or snack into a'gastronomic feast'.
When we move with the body's design, we experience physical sensations of joy and aliveness.
They have developed a technique that could eventually allow people to feel heat and other sensations through their new limbs.