Sendai virus


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Sen·dai vi·rus

a parainfluenza virus type 1 reported to cause inapparent infection in many animals; also used extensively to effect fusion of tissue culture cells.
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Sendai virus

n.
A paramyxovirus that causes respiratory tract infections in mice, rats, and other mammals, used in the laboratory to induce the formation of hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grdzelishvili, "Sequence-function analysis of the Sendai virus L protein domain VI," Virology, vol.
Specific gangliosides are receptors for Sendai virus. Proteins in lipid samples can mask positive biological effects.
Susceptibility of inbred and outbred mouse strains to Sendai virus and prevalence of infection in laboratory rodents.
Although tissue must be removed when the colloidal gold technique is used, the scientists are now evaluating another marker that is already being used in clinical imaging techniques and that might be engulfed by reforming Sendai virus envelopes -- thus providing a way to follow grafts in vivo.
Sendai virus enables delivery of genes into a host cell without permanently altering the cell's chromosome, which is critical for stem cell therapies.
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from the donor fibroblasts using the CytoTune-iPS Scndai Rcprogramming Kit, an integration-free reprogramming tool utilizing Sendai virus.
Unlike other viruses used for this process, the Sendai virus does not become part of the cell's genes.
Delayed clearance of Sendai virus in mice lacking class I MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells.
Unlike other viruses used for this process, the Sendai virus docs not become part of the cell's genes.
Mapping of antigenic domains of Sendai virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli.
In addition, pIgA, as opposed to IgG or monomeric IgA, neutralizes virus intracellularly, as first was shown with Sendai virus (24).