monofilament

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monofilament

Neurology A nylon bristle passed over the sole of the foot to detect loss of sensation in a diabetic foot and circulatory defects. See Diabetic foot.

monofilament

(mŏn′ō-fĭl″ă-mĕnt) [″ + filum, thread]
A strand of nylon used to assess sensation in peripheral nerves, especially in the feet of patients with diabetes mellitus and other neuropathic conditions. The inability to feel the prodding of a strand of monofilament on the foot in one or more locations is diagnostic of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

monofilament

non-braided (i.e. solid) thread, usually made of nylon or polygalactic acid

monofilament,

n a single strand of untwisted synthetic material such as nylon; used to create surgical sutures.
References in periodicals archive ?
10 DASH = Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (questionnaire); MIGF = maximum isometric grip force; MPUT-EO-MPUT-EC = Moberg Pickup Test with eyes open and eyes closed, respectively; OA = osteoarthritis; SD = standard deviation; SWMT = Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament Test; VAS = visual analog scale.
The most frequently used modality for detecting neuropathy in clinical practice is the nylon Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (8).
Abbreviations: ADT = attention-demanding task, ANOVA = analysis of variance, AP = anteroposterior, CNS = central nervous system, COP = center of pressure, DM = diabetes mellitus, ML = mediolateral, MTP = metatarsophalangeal joint, RMS = root-mean-square, SR = stochastic resonance, SWM = Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, UMCG = University Medical Center Groningen.
Identifying patients with diabetes mellitus who are at risk for lower-extremity complications: use of Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments.
Does the use of the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament or another method of neuropathy screening reduce the outcome of ulcers and amputation in persons with diabetes?
Interpreting the results of the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test: accounting for false-positive answers in the international consensus on the diabetic foot protocol by a new model.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the usefulness of the diabetic neuropathy examination score (DNE), diabetic neuropathy symptom (DNS) score, 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament examination, ankle reflex and measuring vibration perception threshold (VPT) with a biothesiometer in the detection of diabetic polyneuropathy in type 2 diabetes patients and to seek an optimal screening method in diabetic clinic in the detection of diabetic polyneuropathy in type 2 diabetes patients.
Feasible sensory tests available to family physicians for detection of diminished skin sensitivity include pin prick, cotton wool, and von Frey or Semmes-Weinstein monofilament hairs, together with calipers for two-point discrimination.
However a second study by the same group which compares quantitative thermal testing with Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing shows that both tests were good at detecting nerve damage with the thermal testing having higher sensitivity and specificity.
One of the reasons for late diagnosis is that 20-30% of the nerve fibres must be affected before nerve damage can be diagnosed clinically with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments or voluntary muscle testing.
Changes in touch sensitivity were measured using standard neurological exams: Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments and a vibration perception threshold test.