semisynthetic

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semisynthetic

 [sem″e-sin-thet´ik]
produced by chemical manipulation of naturally occurring substances.

sem·i·syn·thet·ic

(sem'ē-sin-thet'ik),
Describing the process of synthesizing a particular chemical using a naturally occurring chemical as a starting material, thus obviating part of a total synthesis, for example, the conversion of cholesterol (obtained from a natural source) into a corticosteroid.

semisynthetic

(sĕm′ē-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk, sĕm′ī-)
adj.
1. Prepared by chemical synthesis from natural materials: a semisynthetic antibiotic.
2. Consisting of a mixture of natural and synthetic substances: a semisynthetic culture medium.

sem·i·syn·thet·ic

(sem'ē-sin-thet'ik)
Describing the process of synthesizing a particular chemical using a naturally occurring chemical as a starting material, thus obviating part of a total synthesis.

sem·i·syn·thet·ic

(sem'ē-sin-thet'ik)
Describing process of synthesizing a particular chemical using a naturally occurring chemical as a starting material, thus obviating part of a total synthesis, e.g., conversion of cholesterol into a corticosteroid.
References in periodicals archive ?
In pharmaceutical industries, 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) is a very important intermediate product, primarily for being the precursor for the semisynthesis of [beta]-lactam antibiotics [35] such as ampicillin and amoxicillin.
Semisynthesis and antifeedant activity of new acylated derivatives of tutin, a sesquiterpene lactone from Coriaria sinica.
A semisynthesis of taxol developed by researchers at Florida State University allowed taxol to be distributed on a wide scale.
Semisynthesis: active principle's natural structure is sometimes synthetically modified, semisynthesis is carried out in reactors with a capacity of up to 10000 liters per batch, reactors can be in glass, enamel or AISI 316 stainless steel.
Androgens for pharmaceutical use are not synthesized de novo; they are obtained by semisynthesis from starting materials such as diosgenin and stigmasterol, which are derived from plants (1).
Natural products are not only used as therapeutic agents, they also constitute a source of lead compounds that have provided the basis for new drugs semisynthesis or total synthesis (Newman and Cragg, 2012; Cragg et al., 2009).
References [49, 50, 52] provides evidence that these are potential lead compounds for future anticancer drug development or may serve as chemical templates for the design, synthesis, and semisynthesis of new substances for the treatment of cancer.