semisynthetic

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semisynthetic

 [sem″e-sin-thet´ik]
produced by chemical manipulation of naturally occurring substances.

sem·i·syn·thet·ic

(sem'ē-sin-thet'ik),
Describing the process of synthesizing a particular chemical using a naturally occurring chemical as a starting material, thus obviating part of a total synthesis, for example, the conversion of cholesterol (obtained from a natural source) into a corticosteroid.

semisynthetic

/semi·syn·thet·ic/ (-sin-thet´ik) produced by chemical manipulation of naturally occurring substances.

semisynthetic

(sĕm′ē-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk, sĕm′ī-)
adj.
1. Prepared by chemical synthesis from natural materials: a semisynthetic antibiotic.
2. Consisting of a mixture of natural and synthetic substances: a semisynthetic culture medium.

semisynthetic

[-sinthet′ik]
Etymology: L, semi, half; Gk, synthesis, putting together
pertaining to a natural substance that has been partially altered by chemical manipulation.

sem·i·syn·thet·ic

(sem'ē-sin-thet'ik)
Describing the process of synthesizing a particular chemical using a naturally occurring chemical as a starting material, thus obviating part of a total synthesis.

sem·i·syn·thet·ic

(sem'ē-sin-thet'ik)
Describing process of synthesizing a particular chemical using a naturally occurring chemical as a starting material, thus obviating part of a total synthesis, e.g., conversion of cholesterol into a corticosteroid.

semisynthetic

produced by chemical manipulation of naturally occurring substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Androgens for pharmaceutical use are not synthesized de novo; they are obtained by semisynthesis from starting materials such as diosgenin and stigmasterol, which are derived from plants (1).
The new analog is produced by semisynthesis involving selective
Natural products are not only used as therapeutic agents, they also constitute a source of lead compounds that have provided the basis for new drugs semisynthesis or total synthesis (Newman and Cragg, 2012; Cragg et al.