semiconductor

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sem·i·con·duc·tor

(sem'ē-kon-dŭk'tŏr),
A metalloid that conducts electricity more easily than a true nonmetal but less easily than a metal, for example, silicon, germanium.

semiconductor

[-kənduk′tər]
a solid crystalline substance whose electric conductivity is intermediate between that of a conductor and that of an insulator. An n-type semiconductor has loosely bound electrons that are relatively free to move about inside the material. A p-type semiconductor is one with holes, or positive traps, in which electrons may be bound. The holes may appear to migrate through the material.

semiconductor,

n an object that conducts electricity less than a conductor does but more an insulator does.

sem·i·con·duc·tor

(sem'ē-kŏn-dŭk'tŏr)
A metalloid that conducts electricity more easily than a true nonmetal but less easily than a metal.

semiconductor,

n a solid crystalline substance the electrical conductivity of which is intermediate between that of a conductor and an insulator.
References in periodicals archive ?
edu/ - Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures at the University of Oklahoma/University of Arkansas -- http://www.
Readership: Advanced undergraduate- and graduate-level students in semiconductor physics and technology, spintronics; researchers and engineers in spintronics, semiconductor physics and technology, magnetism.
The focus of their research includes gaining a deeper understanding of semiconductor physics, creating better materials, developing novel device structures, and improving manufacturing methods.
Having graduated as an electronics engineer specialized in semiconductor physics, Mr.
Henry Levinstein, 1919-1986, a professor at Syracuse University known for his pioneering work in the field of semiconductor physics relating to infrared detectors.
Prior to that, he was a doctoral research assistant and teaching assistant at Columbia University, where he gained expertise in semiconductor physics and testing, metallurgy and electronic materials processing.
Simson earned a bachelor's honors degree in electrical engineering in 1975 and a doctorate in semiconductor physics in 1978 from l'Institut National des Sciences Appliquees in Toulouse, France.
Joe holds a MSEE degree with specialization in Semiconductor Physics and an Executive Business Degree.
Metal-insulator electronics utilize quantum tunneling, a phenomenon where electrons on one side of an insulating layer are forced to "appear" on the other side: this is a much faster junction transport mechanism than semiconductor physics allows.

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