narrowing

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narrowing

Decreasing the width or diameter of some space or channel (e.g., narrowing of the size of the coronary arteries), usually due to some pathological process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Semantic changes, like the phonological changes seen in Hinksley, are an inevitable feature of human language.
Politically correct language is at best a short-term fix for the problem of semantic change and offensiveness.
CONCLUSION: Introductory book to semantic change, written in Swedish.
Figuration is a well-known process of semantic change.
The semantic change here is very subtle, almost imperceptible on purely extensional grounds, as is generally the case between a verb and its corresponding action noun: the difference is normally characterized as one between an activity viewed as such in the case of the verb and the same activity viewed as an entity in the case of the action noun.
Of these, the first was based on incomplete and by now entirely outdated material; the second suffers greatly from its author's lack of philological competence in Tocharian and an almost unlimited willingness to accept all kinds of semantic changes.
A semantic change has occurred: what used to be a conversational implicature of the imperative use is now a conventionalized meaning (cf.
Some comments on the development of fugol, which seems later than the semantic change in bird, and time development of hound in contrast with dog, the former being evidently more associated with "defense," the latter with "offense," can be found in Grzega (2000b: 237f).
Traugott and Dasher (both Stanford) offer the first detailed examination of semantic change from the perspective of historical pragmatics and discourse analysis.
From this perspective, semantic change appears as a natural consequence of language usage directly related to cognitive processing.
While early students of linguistics such as, Bechstein (1863), Paul (1880), Breal (1879), Trench (1892) devoted much effort to the issue of diachronic semantic change, the second half of the 20th century was, until the 1980s, marked by a particular dearth of publications on the problems of diachronic semantics.