narrowing

(redirected from Semantic change)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

narrowing

Decreasing the width or diameter of some space or channel (e.g., narrowing of the size of the coronary arteries), usually due to some pathological process.
References in periodicals archive ?
To some extent, the patterns displayed in Figures 2 and 3 are irrelevant for a discussion on semantic change in conversion for two reasons.
This study of the historical development of the polysemous adjective terrific has shown that "polysemy is far from being a stable phenomenon" (Robinson 2010: 85), and that evaluative adjectives like terrific, given their semantic make-up, are prone to experience semantic change.
Semantic changes, like the phonological changes seen in Hinksley, are an inevitable feature of human language.
This semantic change may be related to a morpho-syntactic development as in the majority of cases the meaning 'vital principle' are direct cases (nominate and accusative), while the other meanings are generally associated with indirect cases.
Even when a term that resolves the problem of negative semantic change appears to have been found, this victory is short-lived, and the new, neutral word eventually enters into circulation and is used by bullies as an insult.
Thirdly, the directionalities of some connections may conflict with more general directionalities of meaning change posited in the general literature on grammaticalization and semantic change (e.
An example of metonymy as a cognitive principle triggering semantic change in English is the word cheek meaning 'fleshy side of the face below the eye'.
These examinations of semantic changes lead us to a more nuanced understanding of the history of the Arabic language.
Geeraerts takes the effects of prototypicality postulated by prototype semantics (Kleiber, 1990: 51) and develops from there four causes of semantic change that are directly related to these effects.
Fortson's chapter ("An approach to semantic change") construes semantic change as meaning change through extension or reanalysis.
Therefore, both languages have experienced a semantic change, the Spanish term resulting in a narrowing of the concept and the English one, in a widening or broadening.

Full browser ?