sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hayes, Strosahl, & Wilson, 1999) can help to make sense of the role that acceptance plays in linking religious belief and self-sacrificial religious behavior.
25) While there are glimmers of hope (particularly in the resurrection narratives) that the disciples of Jesus, who exhibit the failures and frailties of human existence, will eventually appropriate Jesus' self-sacrificial vision of life, a reader is left with no more than fleeting glimpses of this, e.
The self-sacrificial Bernadette, subject to an historical manipulation of the Christian principle of self-sacrifice that emphasizes its desirability in women especially, begins the play with a stunted understanding of her own needs.
In this fairly straight-forward framework, self-sacrificial acts ensure the survival of genes.
On some level, her death could even be described as self-sacrificial.
In the last chapter, Good reveals that despite the missionary's self-sacrificial lives, they were affected by racism.
Interestingly, Lee had originated this idea in his character Bleek: During a scat in Mo" Better Blues, Bleek offers to give up his courtside Knicks tickets as a proof of his love for Clarke, and the character's equation of sports spectatorship with self-sacrificial civil service thus anticipates the director's.
Right or wrong as history may judge his championing of the cause of East Timorese independence to have been, it stemmed from deep and passionately held convictions, not least among them his sense of Australia's endebtedness to the East Timorese for their frequently self-sacrificial support of Australian servicemen operating behind enemy lines during the war against Japan.
Such self-sacrificial behavior isn't restricted to the Western religions.
But I am still pretty impressed with the idea that most self-sacrificial conduct and martyrdom that people around the globe are asked to embark upon is actually bogus.
McVeigh's act was not self-sacrificial, but one that made more victims.