self-injury


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self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-injury is the strongest predictor of suicide outside of previous suicide attempts, but there's most likely an opportunity here to prevent that.
Curing self-injury is not a quick process and problems that lead to self-injury have to be addressed.
(5.) "Information for parents: What you need to know about self-injury." The Fact Sheet Series, Cornell Research Program on Self-Injury and Recovery.
Some of the existing options for NSSI assessments with behavioral checklists include the Inventory of Statements About Self-Injury (ISAS; Klonsky & Glenn, 2009), the DSHI (Gratz, 2001), the Ottawa Self-Injury Inventory (OSI; Cloutier & Nixon, 2003), and the SHBQ (Gutierrez, Osman, Barrios, & Kopper, 2001).
Gender differences in non-suicidal self-injury: Are they on the verge of leveling off.
GSM is a heterogeneous form of self-injury that ranges from superficial genital lacerations, amputation, or castration to combinations of these injuries.
Prevalence data prior to this time regarding self-injurious behaviour primarily drew from adult hospital admission rates (where only specific cases will present, as most people do not seek medical attention for their self-injury (Baetens, Claes, Muehlenkamp, Grietens & Onghena, 2011)) and specific samples (i.e., the military).
Conclusion: Non-suicidal self-injury is a serious challenge among children with ASD.
Neural network, when administered on whole data set, indicated type of disability 0.474(100%), education/training 0.99(20.9%) and access of counselling 0.114(24%) as important predictors of non-suicidal self-injury in both groups.
Another study in university students found that there is a continuum between NSSI and suicidal self-injury, and the differences are in degree rather than in kind (Orlando, Broman-Fulks, Whitlock, Curtin, & Michael, 2015).
Non-suicidal self-injury (hereafter referred to as self-injury or SI) is a relatively common behavior among adolescents, with researchers suggesting that upwards of 15-30% of high school students have engaged in this behavior at least once (Muehlenkamp, Claes, Havertape, & Plener, 2012).
Non Suicidal Self-injury (NSSI) consists of any deliberate self-inflicted damage to the surface of the body that is likely to induce bleeding, bruising, or pain, but with no suicidal intent and for purposes that are not socially sanctioned.