self-injury

(redirected from Self-inflicted injury)
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Related to Self-inflicted injury: Self harm, Self abuse, Self mutilation

self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Emergency department providers have a unique opportunity to intervene with self-inflicted injury patients during a high-risk period," Dr.
Characteristics of assault and self-inflicted injury cases seen in selected emergency departments, Brazil, September 2006 (a) Assault Self-harm Characteristic Cases % Cases % Sex Male 3 334 75.
To illustrate this point, the court reiterated an example used by the trial court, which compared "a self-inflicted injury resulting from a drunken dare with a self-inflicted injury resulting from narcolepsy.
However, the Critchlow opinion suggests support for the traditional viewpoint--that putting a noose around your neck is too inherently risky to qualify as anything other than self-inflicted injury if things go wrong and the procedure results in death rather than excitement.
The panel also rejected Hartford's alternative argument that Schanus's intoxication itself was a self-inflicted injury that contributed to his death.
To evaluate the likelihood that a nonfatal self-inflicted injury was suicide-related, CDC analyzed verbatim text comments recorded in the NEISS-AIP database from ED patient charts for each injury.
It is a self-inflicted injury brought about by having too many thinkers and talkers - but too few with the ability or will to initiate and act.
Yet single mums have frequently been allocated family homes and are seriously overhoused and such folks will now be in the firing line for cuts - seemingly a Tristar self-inflicted injury.
He added a "contact gunshot wound to the chest" was consistent with a self-inflicted injury and it had yet to be determined which of two guns found at the crime scene killed him.
Lord Hutton denied the reports, which found Dr Kelly's wounds were "typical of self-inflicted injury," had been concealed and said he asked for them to remain secret for 70 years "solely in order to protect Dr Kelly's widow and daughters" from distress.
And a forensic physician confirmed Thompson's cuts were all typical of self-inflicted injury.