self-injury

(redirected from Self-harming)
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Related to Self-harming: Self injury

self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hospital admissions for children who are self-harming have more than doubled in six years.
The true number of children ending up in hospital after self-harming is likely to be even higher.
Out of the 11,000 children surveyed, one in six reported self-harming at 14.
The report looks at the reasons behind the unhappiness which increases the risk of children self-harming.
One young person told the charity: "I felt like self-harming was what I wanted to do and had to do as there was nothing else I could do.
How you react is important too: "Young people are often reluctant to tell people they're self-harming as they fear adults' reactions," Hayley said.
Although it appears that previous suicide attempts are the most robust risk factor for eventually completed suicide, self-harming behaviors have also been shown to be a strong predictor of suicide in people with SMI, especially women (Haw, Hawton, Sutton, Sinclair, & Deeks, 2005; Hawton, Zahl, & Weatherall, 2003).
A quarter of 14-15 year-old girls in the study said they had thoughts about self-harming and 15 per cent had self-harmed in the previous 12 months, Ms Hollonds said.
SELF-HARMING is when a young person chooses to inflict pain on themselves in some way.
The survey was composed of around 6,000 participants and reveals many children are self-harming more than once a month.
Janet Boden, ChildLine's service manager in Liverpool, said: "Although self-harming is not a new problem, sharing images of self-harm on social media sites is a worrying new development."
Most users went to the forums for empathy or to discuss safety issues rather than talk about how they could reduce their self-harming behaviour.