self-injury

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self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the researchers have suggested an association between RLS and increased risk of developing depression through their previous studies, this is the first time they focused on this syndrome as an independent cause for increased risk of suicide and self-harm.
Figures uncovered by the Evening Express from the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) show there were 175 self-harm incidents at HMP Grampian last year - and there have been at least 231 so far in 2019.
The report shows that self-harm incidents - excluding HMP Berwyn, which opened during 2017 - rose by 16% in the year ending March 2019, following a record figure the previous year.
The fear is that self-harm images online may be normalising the behaviour.
m is upp Are we comparing ourselves o each other so much so that we find it hard to breathe or tomwt It's hard to talk about self-harm understand how different we are and the uniqueness that surrounds us?
"The mental health assessment enables the team to formulate a plan tailored around the patient's care needs, which if appropriate can include a referral to the self-harm clinic or to an alternative service which provides continued support after they leave the hospital."
Instagram promised to ban posts promoting self-harm and suicide, after a campaign was launched in the memory of 14-year-old Molly Russel, who ended her life in 2017 after viewing this kind of content.
The number of individuals committing self-harm is on the rise, too.
"Over the past month, we have seen that we are not where we need to be on self-harm and suicide, and that we need to do more to keep the most vulnerable people who use Instagram safe," Mosseri said in an online post.
Instagram will not allow any graphic images of self-harm on its platform following pressure from parents of suicide victims, Sky News reports.
[USA], Jan 04 (ANI): According to a new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University, youngsters who inflict self-harm are three times more likely to commit violent crime than those who do not.