castration

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Related to Self-castration: Chemical castration

castration

 [kas-tra´shun]
excision of the gonads (bilateral orchiectomy in a male or bilateral oophorectomy in a female), or destruction of the gonads, as by radiation or parasites. If this occurs before puberty, secondary sex characters will fail to develop. See also eunuch.
female castration removal of the ovaries, or bilateral oophorectomy; called spaying in female animals.
male castration bilateral orchiectomy.

cas·tra·tion

(kas-trā'shŭn),
1. Removal of the testicles or ovaries.
2.

castration

The removal of gonads; castration occurs in various contexts:
1. Forensic–a controversial procedure intended to ↓ sexual drives in repeat sex offenders.
2. Pathologic–due to infection, which renders both testes functionally inactive–eg, with filariasis in elephantiasis.
3. Therapeutic–to remove the source of androgens in Pts with androgen-sensitive prostate CA–which can also be accomplished by RT. See Chemical castration, Medical castration, Surgical castration Psychiatry The fantasized loss of the genitals; a mental state of impotence, powerlessness, helplessness, or defeat Urology Surgical removal of testes in ♂ with androgen-dependent prostate CA.

cas·tra·tion

(kas-trā'shŭn)
1. Removal of the testicles or ovaries.
2. See: castration complex; castrate

castration

The removal of the testicles (orchidectomy or orchiectomy), or, sometimes, of all the male external genitalia. The term is also occasionally used to refer to the removal of the ovaries in women. Castration can be valuable in the treatment of androgen dependent cancer of the prostate gland, even if widespread.

castration

see EMASCULATION (2).

castration

or

gelding

) the removal of the testicles.

Huggins,

Charles B., Canadian-U.S. surgeon and Nobel laureate, 1901-1994.
Huggins operation - orchidectomy performed for palliation or cure of cancer of the prostate. Synonym(s): castration
References in periodicals archive ?
(23) Shunning the yoke of marriage he physically and emotionally separated himself from that society by seeking out the Phrygian goddess and performing self-castration, thereby removing any possibility of fulfilling the role of husband.
(5.) Foster (2009, 72) argues that this "new twist" to the myth serves to portray Attis's act as self-castration as particularly shameful: contemporary Romans were familiar with Cybele's cult and her eunuch priests, but that a civilized Greek or Roman youth would voluntarily commit such self-mutilation was unthinkable.
(10.) In Spencer's case, following her self-castration, the prison still refused to provide her with estrogen, offering her only testosterone supplements, which she refused to take.
Some indeed of the resemblances are far-fetched, such as the suggestion that the Montanists' desire of martyrdom corresponds to the self-castration practised by the priests of Cybele.
Dean, the politician, has shown up with a woman he met on the Internet (a critic, of course) who is willing to help him achieve his goal of self-castration.
(10) Although the goddess's worship was an important part of Roman religious life, it was forbidden for a Roman to become one of the galli (eunuch priests) who castrated themselves in commemoration of the self-castration by the young mortal boy Attis.
Attis's casting as a maenad occurs early in the poem, immediately after his self-castration. The previously unidentified frenzy that violated the integrity of his body now becomes specifically maenadic: Attis's spatial movement from Greece to Phrygia is accompanied by his internal movement from sanity to frenzy (vagus animis, 63.4), a frenzy that denotes his state of ecstasy and possession by the spirit of the goddess.
The common ground between initiatory transition, marriage, and maenadism is put to work to construct Attis as a female as soon as his self-castration occurs.
Furthermore, the vivid description of Attis's self-castration with the emphasis on the shedding of fresh blood points at once to ritual sacrifice and the act of defloration.