Selenomonas


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Selenomonas

(sĕ-lē'nō-mō'nas),
A genus of bacteria of uncertain taxonomic affiliation, containing curved to crescentic or helical, gram-negative, strictly anaerobic rods that are motile with an active tumbling motion. Several flagella are present in a tuft, often near the center of the concave side. The type species, Selenomonas sputigena, is found in the human buccal cavity.
[G. selēnē, moon, + monas, single (unit)]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Se·le·no·mo·nas

(sĕ-lē'nō-mō'nas)
A genus of bacteria found in the human oral vestibule.
[G. selēnē, moon, + monas, single (unit)]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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So far, two studies have associated nasal colonisation by Staphylococcus aureus and periodontitis sustained by Fretibacterium, Prevotella nigrescens, and Selenomonas spp.
Effect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on lactate utilization by the ruminal bacterium Selenomonas ruminantium.
Malic acid and fumaric acid are four-carbon dicarboxylic acids that are found in biological tissues (e.g., plants) as intermediates of the citric acid cycle and are intermediates in the succinate-propionate pathway of ruminal bacteria, such as Selenomonas ruminantium, the main gram-negative ruminal bacteria that can account for more than 50% of the total viable bacteria within the rumen [21].
Isolation and characteristics of a ureolytic strain of Selenomonas ruminantum.
An alignment of 175 taxa and 1311 characters was generated including Selenomonas ruminantium (Firmicutes: Selenomonadales) as an outgroup.
The main pathways of the decorboxylation of that type of phenolics occur in the rumen and some ruminal bacteria, such as Selenomonas sp., are able to detoxify tannic acids besides some other anti-nutritional factors of ruminant diets (Bhat et al., 1998; Singh et al., 2001).
Selenite intake and incorporation by Selenomonas ruminantium.
Causative organisms include Treponema spp, Selenomonas spp, Prevotella intermedia, Borrelia spp, Gram-positive cocci, beta-haemolytic group B streptococci and Candida albicans.
Goodson of the Forsyth Institute, Boston, and colleagues raised the possibility in an article in the Journal of Dental Research that a form of bacteria associated with gum disease, Selenomonas noxia, might cause obesity, or that obesity might cause gum disease by leading Selenomonas noxia to flourish, or both.