selenium

(redirected from Selenium compounds)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Selenium compounds: Hydrogen selenide, Zinc compounds, Chromium compounds

selenium

 [sĕ-le´ne-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 34, atomic weight 78.96, symbol Se. (See Appendix 6.) It is an essential mineral nutrient. Dietary sources of selenium include seafoods, kidney, and liver. Humans can adjust their homeostasis mechanism for selenium over a wide range of dietary intakes. Recommended intake levels are generally met from the diet, so that supplements are not necessary.
selenium sulfide
1. the sulfide salt of selenium, a topical antiseborrheic and antifungal applied topically to the scalp to control seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff; also used topically in the treatment of tinea versicolor.
2. the sulfide salt of selenium, an antiseborrheic and antifungal; used topically in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff of the scalp and of tinea versicolor.

se·le·ni·um (Se),

(sĕ-lē'nē-ŭm),
A metallic element chemically similar to sulfur, atomic no. 34, atomic wt. 78.96; an essential trace element toxic in large quantities that is required for glutathione peroxidase and a few other enzymes; 75Se (half-life equal to 119.78 days) is used in scintography of the pancreas and parathyroid glands.
[G. selēnē, moon]

selenium

A non-metallic element (atomic number 34; atomic weigh 8.96) that is required in trace amounts by certain enzymes (e.g., glutathione peroxidase); it interacts with vitamins A, C and E, serving as an antioxidant. Selenium is believed to be anticarcinogenic, to retard ageing, and has been used for arthritis, cataracts, connective tissue disease, dandruff and age-related vision loss.  

Sources
Brewer’s yeast, cereals, dairy products, fish, fruits, liver, organ and muscle meats, seafood, vegetables and whole grains.

se·le·ni·um

(sĕ-lē'nē-ŭm)
A metallic element chemically similar to sulfur; atomic no. 34, atomic wt. 78.96; an essential trace element toxic in large quantities; required for glutathione peroxidase and a few other enzymes; 75Se (half-life equal to 119.78 days) is used in scintography of the pancreas and parathyroid glands.
[G. selēnē, moon]

selenium

A trace element recently found to be an essential component of the enzyme deiodinase which catalyses the production of triiodothyronine (T3) from thyroxine (T4) in the thyroid gland. Selenium deficiency prevents the formation of T3.

se·le·ni·um

(sĕ-lē'nē-ŭm)
A metallic element used in scintography of pancreas and parathyroid glands.
[G. selēnē, moon]
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the exact cell death mechanism stimulated by the selenium compounds used was not established spectrometrically, NMR spectral data confirmed microscopy results that SeMSC triggered more cell stress response in the prostate cell lines used.
Microtubule distribution in cells treated with both selenium compounds was analyzed by immunocytochemistry after 48 h of exposure.
Determination of selenium compounds in urine samples by liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with an ultrasonic nebulizer.
He added that selenium compounds could be given as a dietary supplement or in the form of a skin cream to protect against sunlight.
Since the three best-studied selenium compounds differ in the way your body handles them and in their impact on cancer risk, it is important to combine them for maximum protection.
Garlic bulbs are naturally enriched with a unique composition of organic selenium compounds for nutritional supplementation, using a proprietary hydroponics method.
2006), and some selenium compounds such as selenite and methylselenol (a metabolite of selenomethionine) (Rayman 2005) can induce oxidative stress (Drake 2006; Spallholz 1994; Spallholz et al.
Biological availability of selenium in feedstuffs and selenium compounds for prevention of exudative diathesis in chicks.
Selenium-SeLECT (L-selenomethionine), a GRAS-affirmed ingredient, and MethySelene (Se-methyl-L-selenocysteine) and SelenoForce (selenium enriched garlic) are bioavailable sources of organic selenium compounds for selenium supplementation.
Each one of these selenium compounds provides unique biological benefits.
High-selenium yeast contains certain selenium compounds (such as methyl selenocysteine) that are not present in other selenium supplements, so the results of this study cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other forms of supplemental selenium.
Sodium selenite is absorbed more slowly, possibly by simple diffusion through the intestinal mucosa, than the amino acid-bound selenium compounds (Reasbeck et al., 1985).