Seldinger technique


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Sel·din·ger tech·nique

(sel'ding-gĕr),
a method of percutaneous insertion of a catheter into a blood vessel or space. A needle is used to puncture the structure and a guide wire is threaded through the needle; when the needle is withdrawn, a catheter is threaded over the wire; the wire is then withdrawn, leaving the catheter in place.

Seldinger technique

A generic eponymous term for any guidewire procedure, named after Swedish radiologist Dr Sven-Ivar Seldinger (1921–1998),  who introduced the procedure in 1953, which allows safe access to blood vessels and hollow organs. Seldinger techniques entail percutaneous puncture with a trocar or needle, tract or vessel dilation as needed, advancement of a guidewire and removal of the trocar. A “sheath” or blunt cannula can then be passed over the guidewire into the cavity or vessel of interest (alternatively, drainage tubes are passed over the guidewire, as in chest drains or nephrostomies); after passing a sheath of tube, the guidewire is withdrawn.

Sel·din·ger tech·nique

(sel'ding-er tek-nēk')
A method of percutaneous insertion of a catheter into a blood vessel or space, such as an abscess cavity: a needle is used to puncture the structure and a guide wire is threaded through the needle; when the needle is withdrawn, a catheter is threaded over the wire; the wire is then withdrawn, leaving the catheter in place.

Seldinger,

Sven Ivar, Swedish radiologist, 1921–.
Seldinger cardiac catheterization
Seldinger catheter
Seldinger intubation technique
Seldinger method
Seldinger needle
Seldinger retrograde wire
Seldinger technique - a method of percutaneous insertion of a catheter into an artery or vein.
Seldinger wire
References in periodicals archive ?
The Seldinger technique was developed to improve the results of bedside PDC implantation.
Suprapubic bladder catheterisation using the Seldinger technique. The Internet Journal of Urology 2007; Vol 5: No.
Using the Seldinger technique, a double-lumen IVC catheter set was inserted.
The use of the Seldinger technique for intraperitoneal access in the MOP has been shown to be relatively quick, safe and effective.
Using the Seldinger technique, we advanced a 6 French sheath into the right common femoral artery.
PICCs and other percutaneous nontunneled central catheters can be inserted with the Seldinger technique. This method involves venipuncture with a small needle; inserting a guidewire facilitating removal of the needle; enlarging the puncture site with a vessel dilator or scalpel blade; followed by threading the catheter over the guidewire.
The modern origins of interventional radiology began with the development of diagnostic angiography, which can be traced back to the development of the Seldinger technique. Developed by Swen Seldinger in 1953, it proved to be a simple and safe technique to puncture and catheterize a blood vessel.[1] (See Fig.
After local anesthesia with 1% lidocaine (5-10 ml), the right femoral artery was accessed with a 4F or 5F arterial sheath (Terumo Co., Tokyo, Japan) using the modified Seldinger technique. Selective angiography of the celiac-hepatic and superior mesenteric arteries was performed with a 4F or 5F hepatic artery catheter (Cordis, Miami, Florida, USA).
Items : Medical Devices (List 1), Blood Diagnostics Kits and Reagents, Consumables, Disinfectants and Chemicals, Surgical Sutures, X-ray Films and Accessories, Blood Administration Set With Microagregate Filter, Disposable Cvp Catheter Double Lumen (SELDINGER Technique), Disposable Cvp Catheter Double Lumen (SELDINGER Technique), Disposable Needle, Disposable Needle, Disposable Syringe With Fixed Needle 29 G (1ML Graduated, Disposable Syringe Without Needle, Epidural Set With Lor Syringe & Filter, I.V.
The procedure was carried out in the supine position using a transfemoral Seldinger technique under local anaesthesia.
A 7-Fr triple lumen catheter (Certrofix, B.Braun Melsungen AG, Germany) was successfully placed using the Seldinger technique. All ports were aspirated and flushed with heparinised saline, and the triple lumen catheter was secured.