thermoelectricity

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ther·mo·e·lec·tric·i·ty

(ther'mō-ē-lek-tris'i-tē),
An electrical current generated in a thermopile.

thermoelectricity

(thĕr″mō-ē-lĕk-trĭs′ĭ-tē)
Electricity generated by heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transient tests have been designed to verify the capability of the model in predicting sub-processes (Seebeck effect) or abnormal situations where the module behaves like a heat source, producing a net heating.
This conversion process is governed by two primary phenomena: the Seebeck effect and the Peltier effect (1-7).
The conversion mechanism can be photovoltaics (solar cells), thermovoltaics (Seebeck effect), piezoelectric (as with a batteryless gas lighter), electrodynamic (like a bicycle dynamo for example) or other options.
Other materials discussed include SrTiO3/TiO2, exhibiting a fivefold higher Seebeck effect compared with bulk material; the pulsed laser deposition of flat MgO(111) films on Al2O3(0001) substrates and of atomically flat MgO(111) films on YSZ(111) substrates with NiO(111) buffer layers.
Peltier elements used in a power generator mode are based on Seebeck effect. The development of a thermoelectric (TE) device arguably began in the early 19th century (DiSalvo 1999).
Pain said the boot uses the Seebeck effect, named after physicist Thomas Johann Seebeck, in which a circuit made of two dissimilar metals conducts electricity if the two places where they connect are held at different temperatures.
Pain said the boot uses the Seebeck effect, named after physicist Thomas Johann Seebeck, in which a circuit of two dissimilar metals conducts electricity if the two places where they connect are held at different temperatures.
While many semiconductor materials can produce an electric potential when heated through something called the Seebeck effect, that effect is very weak in carbon.
The thermoelectric effect or thermoelectricity encompasses three separately identified effects: the Seebeck effect, the Peltier effect and the Thomson effect.
Heat from various sources such as solar heat, geothermal heat and exhaustion of the automobiles can be directly converted into electricity using thermoelectric (TE) device (via the "Seebeck effect").
Seebeck Effect. The Seebeck effect was discovered by Thomas Seebeck in 1821.