sediment

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Related to Sedimentary soil: Sediments

sediment

 [sed´ĭ-ment]
a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt),
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis. Synonym(s): sedimentum
2. To cause or effect the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in centrifugation or ultracentrifugation. Synonym(s): sedimentate
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sediment

/sed·i·ment/ (sed´ĭ-ment) a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sediment

[sed′imənt]
Etymology: L, sedimentum, settling
a deposit of relatively insoluble material that settles to the bottom of a container of liquid.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in the case of centrifugation or ultracentrifugation.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sediment

insoluble material within a liquid that separates and sinks on standing

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sediment,

n a deposit of relatively insoluble material that settles to the bottom of a container of liquid.

sediment

a deposit, often a precipitate, that develops spontaneously.

sediment activity test
a test of ruminal function based on the speed with which the sediment in a sample of rumen fluid floats to the top, an indication that it has been digested.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similar relationships between particle size and magnetic properties were found by Crockford and Olley (1998) in a sedimentary soil near Wagga Wagga, in the Murrumbidgee catchment of NSW, and by Crockford and Fleming (1998) in river sediments of sedimentary origin.
In small quakes, the sedimentary soil washed into the Los Angeles Basin and the San Fernando Valley from surrounding mountains quivers like a bowl of Jell-O, shaking violently at the surface but remaining intact, Henyey said.
Most of the settlement can be attributed to consolidation of the sedimentary soil as ground water was pumped out of the shafts," said Drew.