sediment

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Related to Sedimentary soil: Sediments

sediment

 [sed´ĭ-ment]
a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt),
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis. Synonym(s): sedimentum
2. To cause or effect the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in centrifugation or ultracentrifugation. Synonym(s): sedimentate
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sediment

/sed·i·ment/ (sed´ĭ-ment) a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sediment

[sed′imənt]
Etymology: L, sedimentum, settling
a deposit of relatively insoluble material that settles to the bottom of a container of liquid.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in the case of centrifugation or ultracentrifugation.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sediment

insoluble material within a liquid that separates and sinks on standing

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sediment,

n a deposit of relatively insoluble material that settles to the bottom of a container of liquid.

sediment

a deposit, often a precipitate, that develops spontaneously.

sediment activity test
a test of ruminal function based on the speed with which the sediment in a sample of rumen fluid floats to the top, an indication that it has been digested.
References in periodicals archive ?
The particle size-[Chi] relationship for granite-derived soils and their sediments in this area of New South Wales (Crockford and Starr 1996; Crockford and Olley 1998) is in marked contrast to that of sedimentary soils, in that the magnetic susceptibility in granitic soils increases as the particle size becomes smaller.
Now, with the rapid growth of construction in these regions, it is essential to gain a fuller understanding of residual soils and their properties one that's based on an integrated approach to the study of residual and sedimentary soils.
He identified three key elements: 1) outstanding exposure to the sun on generally eastern facing slopes; 2) the sedimentary soils which stress the vines; 3) cool, wet weather.