sediment

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sediment

 [sed´ĭ-ment]
a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt),
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis. Synonym(s): sedimentum
2. To cause or effect the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in centrifugation or ultracentrifugation. Synonym(s): sedimentate
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in the case of centrifugation or ultracentrifugation.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]
References in periodicals archive ?
When considering bed shear stress in the context of hydrodynamic and/or sediment transport, it is critically important to distinguish between the skin friction component of total bed shear stress responsible for sediment mobilisation and transport and the form drag imposed on the flow by pressure losses in the wake of bed obstacles such as bedforms.
As all the numerical models for the sediment transport, it is necessary to use a hydrodynamic model to estimate the velocities field.
Basic flow relationships of continuity, resistance, and sediment transport can be used to demonstrate the mechanism of a channel self-adjustments.
Estimation of Sediment transport in Rivers Using CCHE2D Model(Case Study: Karkheh River), INDJST, India.
* sediment transport models predicting transport and fate of suspended sediments, the exchange of sediments between water column and seabed, and the penetration of light into the water column; and
where Q is the discharge, S is the cross-section-averaged suspended sediment concentration, [S.sub.*] is the cross-section-averaged suspended sediment transport capacity, A is the cross-sectional area, B is the water surface width, H is the mean elevation of the cross-sectional water surface, [Z.sub.0] is the mean elevation of the riverbed, U is the cross-section-averaged velocity, to is the settling velocity of suspended sediment, [omega] is a recovery coefficient relating to the suspended sediment of the saturation, [G.sub.b] is the bed load sediment transport rate, D is the cross-sectional mean grain diameter of bed load, and [gamma]' is the dry density of suspended sediments.
It is considered the reference of any sediment transport research [21].
Modelling of the sediment transport allows us to examine the direction and magnitude of such processes, as well as define the areas of sediment erosion and accumulation.
(35) To support his case for aqueous deposition of the Coconino, Leonard Brand showed that amphibians in a water tank could leave footprints in fine sand, but his experiments made no attempt to simulate the flow velocities and extreme sediment accumulation rates proposed by YECs in their global Flood scenarios.36 Any argument for aqueous deposition would have to address all of the evidence for eolian deposition and explain the multiple truncations of irregular cross beds and "second order" surfaces by long, "first order" planar surfaces, while remaining consistent with sediment transport rates required to form the Coconino in a matter of days.

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