secretion

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Related to Secretory vesicles: Smooth endoplasmic reticulum

secretion

 [se-kre´shun]
1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted, such as sebum (the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin), saliva (produced by the salivary glands), and gastric juice (secreted by specialized glands of the stomach). The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes.

se·cre·tion

(se-krē'shŭn),
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored in or used by the organism in which it is produced. Compare: excretion.
[L. secerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

(sĭ-krē′shən)
n.
1. The process of secreting a substance, especially one that is not a waste, from the blood or cells: secretion of hormones; secretion of milk by the mammary glands.
2. A substance, such as saliva, mucus, tears, bile, or a hormone, that is secreted.

se·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or by an aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored up in or used by the organism in which it is produced.
Compare: excretion
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

The synthesis and release of chemical substances by cells or glands. Substances secreted include enzymes, hormones, lubricants, surfactants and neurotransmitters. Internal secretion is secretion into the bloodstream. External secretion may be into the intestinal canal or other organs or on to the skin. Compare EXCRETION.

secretion

  1. the process by which a useful substance produced in a cell is passed through the plasma membrane to the outside.
  2. the substance itself. Secretions are usually produced by gland cells, but may be the results of cell destruction as in SEBACEOUS GLANDS. Glands of internal secretion (ENDOCRINES) pass their secretions directly into the blood stream whereas glands of external secretion (EXOCRINES) pass their secretions into special ducts.

Secretion

A substance, such as saliva or mucus, that is produced and given off by a cell or a gland.
Mentioned in: Expectorants

secretion 

1. The substance produced by a cell or organ (e.g. a gland). 2. Production by a cell or organ of a physiologically active substance. This flow out of a cell is driven by an osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane, which is created by active transport of one or more ion species from one side to the other. See active transport; ultrafiltration.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of cell or organ in which formed.
2. Solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity stored in or used by organism in which it is produced.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

Patient discussion about secretion

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secretion
References in periodicals archive ?
(g, h) Yellow arrows, secretory vesicles. Scale bar = 50 [micro]m (a, b), 25 [micro]m (c, d), 50 [micro]m (e, f), 5 [micro]m (g, h), and 0.5 [micro]m (i, j).
(c, d) Red arrows, secretory vesicle immunostaining for VAMP8 and E- cadherin expression in conjunctival epithelia (e, f) and lacrimal gland (g, h) from cGVHD (case 3) (e, g) and SS (case 2) (f, h) patient.
Borregaard, "Neutrophil granules and secretory vesicles in inflammation," Microbes and Infection/ Institut Pasteur, vol.
Borregaard, "Mobilization of granules and secretory vesicles during in vivo exudation of human neutrophils," Journal of Immunology, vol.
The calcium sensitivity of individual secretory vesicles is invariant with the rate of calcium delivery.
Membrane-proximal tryptophans of synaptobrevin II stabilize priming of secretory vesicles. J.
Calcium-induced fusion of sea urchin egg secretory vesicles with planar phospholipid bilayer membranes.
In vitro reconstitution of exocytosis from plasma membrane and isolated secretory vesicles. J.
Synaptotagmin-1 docks secretory vesicles to syntaxin- I/SNAP-25 acceptor complexes.
Characterization of cortical secretory vesicles from the sea urchin egg.
Calcium can disrupt the SNARE protein complex on sea urchin egg secretory vesicles without irreversibly blocking fusion.
Membrane fusion of secretory vesicles of the sea urchin egg in the absence of NSF.