secretion

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secretion

 [se-kre´shun]
1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted, such as sebum (the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin), saliva (produced by the salivary glands), and gastric juice (secreted by specialized glands of the stomach). The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes.

se·cre·tion

(se-krē'shŭn),
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored in or used by the organism in which it is produced. Compare: excretion.
[L. secerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

(sĭ-krē′shən)
n.
1. The process of secreting a substance, especially one that is not a waste, from the blood or cells: secretion of hormones; secretion of milk by the mammary glands.
2. A substance, such as saliva, mucus, tears, bile, or a hormone, that is secreted.

se·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or by an aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored up in or used by the organism in which it is produced.
Compare: excretion
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

The synthesis and release of chemical substances by cells or glands. Substances secreted include enzymes, hormones, lubricants, surfactants and neurotransmitters. Internal secretion is secretion into the bloodstream. External secretion may be into the intestinal canal or other organs or on to the skin. Compare EXCRETION.

secretion

  1. the process by which a useful substance produced in a cell is passed through the plasma membrane to the outside.
  2. the substance itself. Secretions are usually produced by gland cells, but may be the results of cell destruction as in SEBACEOUS GLANDS. Glands of internal secretion (ENDOCRINES) pass their secretions directly into the blood stream whereas glands of external secretion (EXOCRINES) pass their secretions into special ducts.

Secretion

A substance, such as saliva or mucus, that is produced and given off by a cell or a gland.
Mentioned in: Expectorants

secretion 

1. The substance produced by a cell or organ (e.g. a gland). 2. Production by a cell or organ of a physiologically active substance. This flow out of a cell is driven by an osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane, which is created by active transport of one or more ion species from one side to the other. See active transport; ultrafiltration.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of cell or organ in which formed.
2. Solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity stored in or used by organism in which it is produced.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

Patient discussion about secretion

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secretion
References in periodicals archive ?
A combined mass spectrometric and cDNA sequencing approach to the isolation and characterization of novel antimicrobial peptides from the skin secretions of Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis azurea.
In this study, leptin levels were significantly decreased (P<0.001) in case of fasting monkeys compared to normal fed, suggesting that fasting has suppressive effect on leptin secretion. These results are in accordance with various studies where fasting caused decreased leptin concentrations in rodents, pigs and humans (Ahima et al., 1996; Kolaczynski et al., 1996; Barb et al., 2001b).
Leaf gland secretions: A typical EDS X-ray spectrum of the capitate glandsecretions revealed prominent characteristic C N O Na P and Ca X-ray emission peaks with the corresponding weight percentage of 13.3% 1.4% 55.0% 4.8% 10.2% and 12.6% respectively (Fig.
He injected them with a chemical to make them produce more of their skin secretions, then soaked them in water for 15 minutes until the secretions had leeched into the water.
The principal investigator transported all secretions to the laboratory and conducted the analysis.
For instance, in other amphibian genera (Phyllomedusa [29] and Leptodactylus [30]) the protein contents in their skin secretions seem to have evolved towards being less representative, which may be an indication that proteins were not selected as major cutaneous toxins.
The scientist, Professor John Michael Conlon from the Department of Biochemistry at the UAEU, has been conducting further research and testing on the chemicals found in the skin secretions of frogs.
It's designed to oscillate during exhalation and inhalation to help remove endobronchial secretions.
In summary, we may observe that while the composition of the secretions of the three species is similar in constituting mixtures of ketones and naphthoquinones, there are significant differences both qualitative and quantitative.
Dehydration, which often accompanies the dying process, increases the thickness and tenaciousness of secretions. Mobilization of secretions thus becomes more difficult for the patient.
"For the most part, the people who have come down with this bird flu have been in long, sustained contact with the feces and respiratory secretions of infected birds," says John El-Attrache, an avian virologist at Texas A&M University.