sea snake

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sea snake

n.
Any of various venomous aquatic snakes of the family Elapidae (or Hydrophiidae) that inhabit tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans and that bear live offspring.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Any of the venomous elapid snakes that inhabit warm coastal waters from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific.
Toxicology Envenomation bites are usually painless and may not even be noticed when contact is made
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I have always wondered how sea snakes seem to know I am there before they see me," D'Anastasi said.
The Australian Institute of Marine Science describes Australia as a "global hotspot" for sea snakes, as it's home to 30 of the 70 known species worldwide.
There are over 65 species of sea snakes in the tropical waters of the Southern Hemisphere, ranging from Africa to the Gulf of Panama.
Each of the sea snakes can generate about 9.25 megawatts of electricity; enough to power 1,500 households.
They are embodied, in embryo, in the Mariner's luminous encounter with the sea snakes, whether Coleridge was fully conscious of it or not (and Coleridge, we should remember, was a pioneering thinker in regards to the workings of the unconscious).
Hence the species on page 156 is the Yellow Sea Snake and not the Short Sea Snake described on the facing page.
And then there is the night market, perhaps more alarming than charming, being something of a food zoo where chicken and noodles are sold alongside goat testicles and star fish, skewered sea-horses and scorpions, sea snakes and worms.
Bryan Fry, a biologist at the University of Melbourne in Australia, does just that with rattlesnakes, king cobras, death adders, sea snakes, and other reptiles most of us would rather avoid.
It's the Laocoon, Harry Potter--style: Just as the Trojan priest was attacked by sea snakes as punishment for correctly predicting the future, so this wizard seems to have been hoisted by his own starry petard.
Whole-body reconstructions of this species often depict it with a compressed paddle-like tail as seen in Recent sea snakes of the family Hydrophiidae (e.g., 3, 4, 6).
Inclusion of exotic subjects, such as treatment of bites by sea snakes and scorpions and attacks by large animals, makes for interesting reading.
SEA SNAKES are just one of hundreds of by-catch species caught by trawlers in Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery (NPF).