sediment

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sediment

 [sed´ĭ-ment]
a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt),
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis. Synonym(s): sedimentum
2. To cause or effect the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in centrifugation or ultracentrifugation. Synonym(s): sedimentate
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in the case of centrifugation or ultracentrifugation.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]
References in periodicals archive ?
Stable isotope signals of eutrophication in Baltic Sea sediments. Journal of Marine Systems, 25, 287-298.
In the depths of 66 to 112 cm and with sea water onrushing, again sea sediments with following species were observed:
First, events as young and as brief as the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period have never before been resolved in deep sea sediments from the open ocean.
Only recently have improved sediment-recovery techniques realized their full potential for revealing information about geologically rapid processes recorded in deep sea sediments.
From piston cores we know that periods of strong heat influx to the arctic realm are characterized by high foraminifer content in Norwegian Sea sediments. Deep drilling on the Voring Plateau has shown that the onset of strong pulses of foraminifer accumulation coincides with the MPR event 900,000 years ago.
Attempts to obtain deep sea sediments from polar regions during the initial drilling program were limited by persistent harsh, icy weather.
When they looked in detail at records of sea sediments, Gerard C.
During the 1970s, magnetostratigraphic studies from pelagic limestone sections of land and deep sea sediments drilled during DSDP confirmed most of the magnetic polarity intervals (or chrons) determined from profiles of marine magnetic anomalies.