jellyfish

(redirected from Scyphomedusae)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

jel·ly·fish

(jel'ē-fish),
Marine coelenterates (class Hydrozoa) including some poisonous species, notably Physalia, the Portuguese man-of-war; toxin is injected into the skin by nematocysts on the tentacles, causing linear wheals.
Synonym(s): jelly (2)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

jellyfish

(jĕl′ē-fĭsh′)
n. pl. jellyfish or jelly·fishes
a. Any of numerous usually free-swimming marine cnidarians of the class Scyphozoa, characteristically having a gelatinous, tentacled, often bell-shaped medusa stage as the dominant phase of its life cycle. Also called true jellyfish.
b. Any of various similar or related cnidarians.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

jel·ly·fish

(jel'ē-fish)
Marine coelenterates, including some poisonous species; toxin is injected into the skin by nematocysts on the tentacles, causing linear wheals.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

jellyfish

  1. any large medusa of the class Scyphozoa.
  2. the medusoid stages of any coelenterate.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
New records i.e., geographical positions of 11 scyphomedusae and 1 cubomedusa species are presented in the present review but in all cases corresponded to species previously reported for the study region in spite of the large number of samples examined.
Thus, leatherback turtles travel thousands of kilometers from western Pacific beaches to forage on seasonally abundant jellyfish (Scyphomedusae) along the West Coast of North America (Eisenberg and Frazier, 1983; Shenker, 1984), where coastal upwelling creates a dynamic and highly productive ecosystem.
Flow and feeding by swimming scyphomedusae. Marine Biology 124:399-406.
Being a report on the scyphomedusae collected by the U.S.
A total of 27 species of jellyfish were identified: 25 hydromedusae and 2 scyphomedusae. Twelve jellyfish species (11 hydromedusae and 1 scyphomedusae) were recorded for the first time in the Magellan region (Table 1).
Organization of the ectodermal nervous structures in jellyfish: scyphomedusae. Biol.
Relacion entre la distribucion de vientos y la aparicion de Scyphomedusae en el Puerto de Punta del Este (R.O.
This dual set of diffuse, non-polarized conducting systems in scyphomedusae was noted in behavioral experiments (Eimer, 1874, 1877; Romanes, 1876, 1878; Mayer, 1910; Bozler, 1926a, b), and later demonstrated with electrophy siological recordings by Horridge (1956a, b) and Passano (1965).
Immunohistochemical staining of scyphomedusae with monoclonal antibodies against [alpha]- or [beta]-tubulin shows a subumbrellar nerve net that has the distribution and neuronal characteristics of the motor nerve net that controls the swim musculature (Giant Fiber Nerve Net, also called the Motor Nerve Net; Horridge, 1956a, b; Schwab and Anderson, 1980; Anderson and Schwab, 1981).
The association with scyphomedusae and other large gelatinous zooplankton exhibited by juveniles may continue throughout their lives, because such prey are reported to constitute a considerable portion of the prowfish diet (Carollo and Rankin, 1998).
Escape behavior of Acartia hudsonica copepods during interactions with scyphomedusae. J.