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screen

 [skrēn]
1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector; called also protectant and protective.
2. to separate well individuals in a population from those who have an undiagnosed disease, defect, or other pathologic condition or who are at high risk by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures. See also screening.
Bjerrum screen tangent screen.
fluoroscopic screen a phosphorescent screen that shows the movement and relationship of organs and structures in fluoroscopy.
intensifying screen a fluorescent screen used in conjunction with x-ray film to enhance the effect of the radiation and reduce dosage to the patient. The screen must be matched to the emissivity range; the emissivity of phosphorus is similar to that of the human eye, so that phosphors absorb x-ray energy and convert it to visible light.
tangent screen a large square of black cloth with a central mark for fixation; used with a campimeter in mapping the field of vision.

screen

(skrēn),
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
See also: screen memory.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
See also: screen memory.
3. Formerly, to make a fluoroscopic examination.
See also: screen memory.
4. In psychoanalysis, concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory.
5. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
6. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
n.
1. A movable device that serves to protect, conceal, or divide.
2. A surface or device on which an image is displayed for viewing.
3. A screen memory.
v.
1. To process a group of people in order to select or separate certain individuals from it.
2. To test or examine for the presence of disease or infection.
3. To subject to genetic screening.

screen

Molecular biology
verb To detect a phenotype’s presence or absence by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement or permissive and non-permissive conditions), usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Public health
noun
(1) Any systematic activity—e.g., measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol; pap smear; or other activity—which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population.
(2) A popular term for a solar protection barrier.

screen

Public health
1. Any systematic activity–eg, measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol, pap smear, or other activity, which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population. See Drug screen, General health screen, Laxative screen, Memory Impairment screen, Metabolic screen, Neonatal screen.
2. A solar protection barrier. See Sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence (e.g., heat, light, x-rays).
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. psychoanalysis Concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory
4. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
5. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
6. To examine for the presence or absence of specified characteristics to determine whether further examination is needed.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate some individuals from it.
Synonym(s): screening (1).
[Fr. écran]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mangansakan further revealed that his 2010 film 'Limbunan' was likewise pirated with the use of an Urian screener.
The TSA last week won approval from Congress to move $34 million of its budget toward hiring 768 more screeners, and the agency plans to install (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/05/24/tsa-hopes-post-wait-times-top-airports-mid-june/84853332/) automated bin systems like those in place in airports around the world so that TSA employees don't have to spend their time wrangling containers.
Being fully computerized, the simulator allows a complete record to be kept of each screener's progress and current competency.
Speaking of checks, in March NBC's Denver affiliate reported that screeners had overlooked 90 percent of fake guns and explosives in covert TSA tests at the Denver International Airport.
Ministry screeners asked for changes to descriptions stating that Okinawa residents had been ''forced by the Japanese military'' into committing mass suicide, leading such phrases to be deleted.
TIP software superimposes simulated threat objects on actual passenger baggage images as they pass before screeners. When a screener spots a threat object, he or she strikes an alert button.
Initially, typical screeners used in powder primer application required an electronic sensing device to detect if they had blocked and needed servicing.
Brian Eddy, CEO of Q3 Innovations, the makers of several alcohol screeners, says more schools are using breathalyzers to deter students from drinking.
Companies such as Secure Wrap, a Miami, Florida company, offered to put employees with 10-year background checks alongside screeners who removed cellophane, says Barry Hough, an analyst at AvGroup, an airline industry consultancy in Miami.
This play is the most unique of the three plays in that 4 and 5 become the initial scoring threats instead of becoming primarily the staggered screeners. 5 first screens for 4, who breaks quickly to the ballside deep corner as the first scoring threat.
One of the most significant changes was the shift from using private screeners to using federal screeners at all but five commercial airports in the United States.