Scoville scale

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A system devised in 1912 by Wilber Lincoln Scoville for determining the relative ‘spiciness’ of hot peppers; under the Scoville method, a dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol, serially diluted in sugar water and given to a panel of tasters who sip increasingly diluted concentrations of peppers out of shot glass to the point at which the tasters no longer have a sensation of burning

Scoville scale

Nutrition/masochism A system devised by WL Scoville for determining the relative 'spiciness' of hot peppers; a dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol, serially diluted in sugar water and given to a panel of tasters who sip increasingly diluted concentrations of peppers. See Capsaicin, Spicy food.
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4 million Scoville heat units on the Scoville scale".
Events manager Laura Cotter added: "As the team's chilli enthusiast, I'm certainly excited to be showcasing our Chilli Carnival and offering the people of Liverpool the chance to sample dishes from the mild to the top of the Scoville scale.
Reading online that the Trinidad morugu measured two million on the Scoville scale was possibly the worst thing I could have done.
Scoville, Regional Director General, Prairie Region, CBSA
Winston (Kip) Scoville as its North American agent.
18 million Scoville heat units-the metric for everything spicy-the aptly named 'Pepper X' will soon be burning people's tastebuds around the world.
The scorching curry is made with the Naga chilli, which is 200 times hotter than Tabasco sauce, and has a rating of one million on the Scoville chilli scale.
The explosive Volcanic Vindaloo is made with the Naga chilli, which is 200 times hotter than Tabasco sauce and has a rating of one million on the Scoville chilli scale.
Scoville Game coville Game Wilbur Lincoln Scoville was a chemist, award-winning researcher, professor of pharmacology and the second vice-chairman of the American Pharmaceutical Association.
5million on the Scoville scale, which measures the heat of peppers.
48m on the Scoville scale, and it could potentially cause a type of anaphylactic shock for someone who eats it, burning the airways and closing them up.
48 million on the heat measuring Scoville scale, and it could cause a type of anaphylactic shock if eaten, burning and closing the airways.