Scott syndrome

Scott syndrome

recessively inherited coagulation disorder due to defective or absent scramblase (protein that is necessary to take a coagulation enzyme from inside the cell membrane to outside to signal the beginning of coagulation).

Scott syndrome

recessively inherited coagulation disorder due to defective or absent scramblase (protein that is necessary to take a coagulation enzyme from inside the cell membrane to outside to signal the beginning of coagulation).

Scott syndrome

A mild bleeding disorder (OMIM:262890) caused by impaired surface exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine on platelets and other circulating cells after activation with Ca2+-elevating agents.

Molecular pathology
ANO5 mutations cause Scott syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Scott syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which platelets secrete and aggregate normally, but do not "flip" phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine from the inner to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane.
(41.) Zhou Q Sims PJ, Wiedmer T Expression of proteins controlling transbilayer movement of plasma membrane phospholipids in B lymphocytes from a patient with Scott syndrome. Blood 1998;92:1707-12.
Scott syndrome, a bleeding disorder caused by a defective scrambling of membrane phospholipids.
A rare congenital platelet functional disorder is Scott syndrome, due to defective "flip" of phosphatidyl serine to the outer table of the platelet membrane.
Assembly of the platelet prothrombinase complex is linked to vesiculation of the platelet plasma membrane: studies in Scott syndrome: an isolated defect in platelet procoagulant activity.
Disorders of platelet procoagulant activity (Scott syndrome)
Scott syndrome is a rare congenital platelet functional disorder.