prediction

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prediction

(pri-dik′shŏn)
1. An act of predicting.
2. Something predicted.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in equation 10, the weight of resource integration and real time observation and scientific prediction to information flexibility (dependent variable) is m1, m2, and j1=m1*15.92/34.27, j2=m2*18.35/34.27, the importance of independent variable to dependent variable (such as m1, m2) are determined by expert scoring.
(1) No analysis is given for the tendentious phrase "serious scientific prediction and explanation".
The astrophysicist went on to say it was not necessarily that the hurricane was caused by climate change 6 but that people accepted scientific predictions about the storm.
Of all the scientific predictions that are made, hurricane forecasts are probably the most consequential.
Scientific predictions are that temperatures will continue to rise across the planet.
The Quadrantid can be viewed best either in Europe or North America, depending on which scientific predictions work out for its path.
It is also necessary to focus on educating the public to think critically about science, so that no scientific predictions are taken at face value without questioning.
The final chapter critiques string theory, characterizing it as an emerging religion that cannot make scientific predictions. The book is written at a scholarly level and contains a substantial amount of mathematics.
For example, Arctic's sea ice has melted faster than even most conservative scientific predictions. And the Arctic is the air-conditioning unit of this planet."
If a few of many scientific predictions become reality, the future will be very different.
These bleak projections reflect scientific predictions of the effects of climate change on Indonesia, if nothing more is done, reported the Straits Times.
30 ( ANI ): Scientists have said that changes in average climatic conditions combined with the increasing frequency of unpredictable, extreme weather events may disrupt scientific predictions of the future penguin populations.

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