schizotypal personality disorder

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schizotypal personality disorder

 
a personality disorder characterized by a pattern of social and interpersonal deficits with eccentricities of behavior, thought, and speech. People with schizotypal personalities may exhibit magical thinking, for example, claiming that they are clairvoyant or telepathic, may have recurrent illusions, or may exhibit derealization. Their speech is marked by vagueness, metaphors, odd usages of words, and other features that can make it difficult to understand. Persons with this disorder often are aloof and socially isolated with little capability or desire for close relationships, excessive social anxiety, suspiciousness, and disturbed affect. Although the disorder is related to schizophrenia, it differs in that any periods of psychosis are only transient.

schizotypal personality disorder

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern of behavior in adulthood characterized by discomfort with and reduced capacity for close relationships, cognitive or perceptual distortions, and eccentric behavior.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

schizotypal personality disorder

(skĭt′sə-tī′pəl)
n.
A personality disorder characterized by severe discomfort with close relationships in addition to odd or inappropriate beliefs, behaviors, and speech, but without delusions or other symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia.

schizotypal personality disorder

301.22 DSM-IV Psychiatry A schizophrenia-like condition characterized by defects in interpersonal relationships and disturbed thought patterns, appearance, behavior; Pts with SPD have bizarre speech, poor social skills, strained relationships with others; it is more common in relatives of schizophrenic. See Schizophrenia.

schiz·o·typ·al per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(skiz'ō-tīp'ăl pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
An enduring and pervasive pattern of behavior in adulthood characterized by discomfort with and reduced capacity for close relationships, cognitive or perceptual distortions, and eccentric behavior. People with such a disorder hold ideas that are considered unusual, and have difficulty relating to others.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1993b) showed non-significant LF in high schizotypes with reduced pre-exposure duration on a novel latent inhibition 'card' task, however, other research has failed to replicate this task as a procedure for LI (Burch, Hemsley, & Joseph, unpublished data).
He describes what schizotypic psychopathology is, how to recognize it, and its use for explaining schizophrenia, showing that the disorder begins before the emergence of symptoms and that studying schizotypes provides opportunity for examining risk in nonpsychotic individuals.
The hypothesis was that the high schizotypes would have early visual deficits (P1 component reduction) and working memory similar to that observed in persons with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives.
Saccadic performance in questionnaire-identified schizotypes over time.
& Higgins, 2003), suggesting that high positive schizotypes and high
Holt, Simmonds-Moore, and Moore (2008) described a type of schizotypes known as "happy schizotypes," who tend to have good mental health (although notas good as those who are low in all forms of schizotypy), a belief in the "paranormal," and high scores on creativity measures.
Thus far, reduced negative priming has been shown with elderly people (Hasher, Stoltzfus, Zacks & Rypma, 1991; Stoltzfus, Hasher, Zacks, Ulivi & Goldstein, 1993), young children ([+ or -] eight years; Tipper, Bourque, Anderson & Brehaut, 1989), schizotypes (Beech, Baylis, Smithon & Claridge, 1989; Beech & Claridge, 1987), schizophrenic patients (Beech et al., 1991; Beech, Powell, McWilliam & Claridge, 1989), and with people with high scores on the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire of Broadbent et al.
McCreery and Claridge (1995, 1996) reported that OBE experients scored higher than nonexperients on measures of positive schizotypy (Perceptual Aberration, Luanay-Slade Hallucination Scale, STA, Hypomania) and significantly lower on a measure of negative schizotypy (the Physical Anhedonia Scale), suggesting that, "far from being anhedonic, they were particularly enjoying life." It is possible that among "healthy schizotypes" unusual ideas may reflect creativity and unconventional thinking associated with high Openness to Experience (e.g., Holt, Simmonds-Moore, & Moore, 2008).
The "low schizotypy" cluster (corresponding to the high Unusual Experiences cluster from the previous study) scored significantly higher than the other two clusters on the Sense of Coherence scale, suggesting that this cluster consisted of "healthy schizotypes." Genovese (2005) found that paranormal belief assessed by an eight-item scale was significantly correlated with scores on the Cognitive-Perceptual (i.e., Reality Distortion) and Disorganized dimensions of the SPQ-Brief in a sample of teachers and teacher trainees.