Schisandra chinensis


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Schisandra chinensis

Chinese medicine
A ligneous aromatic vine, the dried berry of which is antidiuretic, antitussive, astringent, demulcent and tonic. It is believed to have rejuvenative properties, and is used for allergic skin reactions, arrhythmias, palpitations, asthma, coughs, wheezing, dermatitis, headaches, hepatitis, infertility, insomnia, lethargy, neuralgia, nocturnal emissions, sweating, urinary frequency and vertigo.
 
Herbal medicine
Schisandra is used by Western herbologists as a tonic to increase the body’s resistance to physical and environmental stress.
 
Toxicity
Restlessness, insomnia, shortness of breath, gastritis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to this in 1943, the Soviet government had already ordered investigations into proposed "tonic substances", predominantly Schisandra chinensis, with the primary aim of identifying substances to improve resistance and performance of USSR defence persons during the Second World War (17).
Kim makes very alkaline lye obtained from leaching ashes of safflower stalks, to which he pours safflower water and then vinegar made from the berries of Schisandra chinensis or "omija." A chemical reaction occurs with the combination of these ingredients, which produces the color red.
Obtained from the berries of Schisandra chinensis, URBALYS[R] fights against biological damages caused by pollution in all its forms and provides long-lasting protection for the skin.
Adaptogens, or herbal medicines that may improve resilience such as Eleutherococcus senticosus and Schisandra chinensis, were used traditionally in herbal medicine to regulate stress response and provide additional benefits of increasing concentration, performance, and endurance in fatigue states (13,30).
The UPR is an adaptive signaling pathway triggered in response to perturbations in ER homeostasis, conditions referred to as ERS.[13],[19] Recent animal and human studies have revealed on the one hand that obesity and fatty liver are associated with ERS-associated factors[21],[35],[36] and that these diseases can be attenuated by chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, Schisandra chinensis extract, or gastric bypass surgery.[21],[37],[38] On the other hand, lipotoxic stress leads to ERS activation in the liver,[4] so the causal relationship between ERS and lipogenesis remains to be clarified.
The major ingredients of KH-204 include five plants, as previously described: Cornus officinalis (32%), Lycium chinense (32%), Rubus coreanus (16%), Cuscuta chinensis (16%), and Schisandra chinensis (4%).
Guo, "Ultrasound-assisted extraction and purification of schisandrin B from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill seeds: optimization by response surface methodology," Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, vol.
Latin name Family 1 Cerasus polytricha Rosaceae 2 Schisandra chinensis Magnoliaceae 3 Litsea pungens Lauraceae 4 Kerria japonica Rosaceae 5 Euonymus verrucosoides Celastraceae 6 Ulmus bergmanniana Ulmaceae 7 Lindera obtusiloba Lauraceae 8 Lonicera fragrantissima standishii Caprifoliaceae 9 Malus baccata Rosaceae 10 Rhus potaninii Anacardiaceae 11 Celastrus orbiculatus Celastraceae 12 Acer elegantulum Aceraceae 13 Acer davidii Aceraceae 14 Melia azedarach Meliaceae 15 Eucommia ulmoides Eucommiaceae 16 Swida walteri Cornaceae 17 Akebia trifoliata Lardizabalaceae Basis for the selection 1 a 2 a 3 b 4 b 5 b 6 a 7 b 8 b 9 a 10 a 11 b 12 b 13 b 14 a 15 a 16 a 17 b Table 2.
Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of Schisandra chinensis pollen extract on CCl4-induced acute liver damage in mice.
Tincture of Schisandra chinensis (Chinese magnolia vine) is used as a stimulant for the prevention of fatigue under heavy exertion [12].
Schisandra chinensis (SC), the magnolia vine, growing in northern Korea, Japan, China, and adjacent regions in Russia, has a long history of association with health care as a medicinal plant.