Schedule III


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Related to Schedule III: Schedule IV, ICAI

Schedule III

a category of drugs that have less potential for abuse or addiction than Schedule II or I drugs. Among the substances so classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency are glutethimide and various analgesic compounds containing codeine.

controlled drug substance

Any drug or therapeutic agent–commonly understood to include narcotics, with a potential for abuse or addiction, which is held under strict governmental control, as delineated by the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention & Control Act passed in 1970
Controlled drug substances
Schedule I drugs High abuse potential, no accepted medical use in US–Acetorphine, acetyl methadol, allyprodine, α—acetylmethadol, bufotenine, dextromoramide, diethyltryptamine, dimethyltryptamine–DMT, etorphine, heroin, ibogaine, ketobemidone, LSD–N,N-diethyl-D-lysergamide or lysergic acid diethylamide, marijuana, mescaline, PCP–phencyclidine, peyote, phenadoxone, phenampromide, racomoramide, tetrahydrocannibol
Schedule II High abuse potential, potentially leading to severe psychologic or physical dependence; schedule II agents have acceptable medical uses, eg narcotics–alphaprodine, anileridine, cocaine, codeine, diphenoxylate, diprenorphine, etorphine HCl, ethymorphine, hydrocordone, hydromorphone, levorphanol, meperidine, methadone, morphine, oxymorphone, poppy straw concentrates, powdered opium, raw opium, thebaine and non-narcotics–amphetamine, amobarbital, methaqualone, methamphetamine, methaqualone, pentobarbital, percodan, phencyclidine, phenmetrazine, secobarbital
Schedule III High abuse potential, moderate to low physical dependence, and high psychologic dependence potential, with acceptable medical uses, which may be narcotic–eg nalorphine, paregoric, or nonnarcotic–eg aprobarbital, benzphentamine, butabarbital, chlorphentermine, chlortermine, glutethimide, mazindol, methyprylon, phendimetrazine, probarbital, talbutal, thiamylal, thiopental, vinbarbital
Schedule IV Minimal abuse potential, limited physical or psychological dependence potential, nonnarcotic, eg barbital, chloral hydrate, chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, chlorazepate, dextropropoxyphene, diazepam, diethylpropion, ethchlorvynol, ethinamate, fenfluramine, lorazepam, mebutamate, methobarbital, meprobamate, methohexital, oxazepam, paraldehyde, phenobarbital, phentermine, prazepam
Schedule V Very low abuse/dependence potential–eg brown mixture–opium, some codeine preparations, diphenozylate preparations–Lomotil, ethylmorphine-Cidicol, opium–Donnagel-PG, terpin hydrate, or non-narcotic, eg loperamide
References in periodicals archive ?
Effective February 27, 1991, this law placed 27 anabolic steroids and their derivatives into Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act.
Licensing Authority ( SLA) and Central Licensing Approval Authority ( CLAA) for Schedule III drugs in the Act.
According to the press release, the format of the review report on statement of compliance from the auditors to the members, specified vide Schedule III thereof, has been revised in the light of recommendations received from the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Pakistan.
The drug, a dissociative general anesthetic agent that blocks dopamine intake, currently is a schedule III controlled substance in the United States.
Buprenorphine is a Schedule III controlled substance and is a mu-opioid receptor partial agonist and a potent analgesic with a relatively long duration of action.
The ballot initiative also contained two other components-a requirement that doctors consult a statewide database before prescribing schedule II and schedule III drugs and a raising of the medical malpractice cap on noneconomic damages from $250,000 to $1.
In October, hydrocodone was switched from a schedule III to the stricter schedule II category.
Dougherty filed his petition asking the DEA to reschedule hydrocodone from Schedule III to Schedule II, the amount of hydrocodone used for medical purposes in the U.
Hydrocodone combined with another drug such as aspirin or acetaminophen, however, is a more lightly regulated Schedule III drug.
Suboxone is a partial agonist, which also blocks craving and withdrawal, that can be prescribed as a Schedule III drug by physicians who have taken an eight-hour course.
Such action would effectively prohibit the marketing of these substances as dietary supplements by regulating them as Schedule III controlled substances.