Schedule II


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Related to Schedule II: Schedule III, Schedule V, Schedule IV

Schedule II

a category of drugs considered to have a strong potential for abuse or addiction but that have legitimate medical use. Among the substances so classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency are morphine, cocaine, pentobarbital, oxycodone, alphaprodine, and methadone.

controlled drug substance

Any drug or therapeutic agent–commonly understood to include narcotics, with a potential for abuse or addiction, which is held under strict governmental control, as delineated by the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention & Control Act passed in 1970
Controlled drug substances
Schedule I drugs High abuse potential, no accepted medical use in US–Acetorphine, acetyl methadol, allyprodine, α—acetylmethadol, bufotenine, dextromoramide, diethyltryptamine, dimethyltryptamine–DMT, etorphine, heroin, ibogaine, ketobemidone, LSD–N,N-diethyl-D-lysergamide or lysergic acid diethylamide, marijuana, mescaline, PCP–phencyclidine, peyote, phenadoxone, phenampromide, racomoramide, tetrahydrocannibol
Schedule II High abuse potential, potentially leading to severe psychologic or physical dependence; schedule II agents have acceptable medical uses, eg narcotics–alphaprodine, anileridine, cocaine, codeine, diphenoxylate, diprenorphine, etorphine HCl, ethymorphine, hydrocordone, hydromorphone, levorphanol, meperidine, methadone, morphine, oxymorphone, poppy straw concentrates, powdered opium, raw opium, thebaine and non-narcotics–amphetamine, amobarbital, methaqualone, methamphetamine, methaqualone, pentobarbital, percodan, phencyclidine, phenmetrazine, secobarbital
Schedule III High abuse potential, moderate to low physical dependence, and high psychologic dependence potential, with acceptable medical uses, which may be narcotic–eg nalorphine, paregoric, or nonnarcotic–eg aprobarbital, benzphentamine, butabarbital, chlorphentermine, chlortermine, glutethimide, mazindol, methyprylon, phendimetrazine, probarbital, talbutal, thiamylal, thiopental, vinbarbital
Schedule IV Minimal abuse potential, limited physical or psychological dependence potential, nonnarcotic, eg barbital, chloral hydrate, chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, chlorazepate, dextropropoxyphene, diazepam, diethylpropion, ethchlorvynol, ethinamate, fenfluramine, lorazepam, mebutamate, methobarbital, meprobamate, methohexital, oxazepam, paraldehyde, phenobarbital, phentermine, prazepam
Schedule V Very low abuse/dependence potential–eg brown mixture–opium, some codeine preparations, diphenozylate preparations–Lomotil, ethylmorphine-Cidicol, opium–Donnagel-PG, terpin hydrate, or non-narcotic, eg loperamide
References in periodicals archive ?
Moving marijuana to Schedule II would remove some of the logistical hurdles and academic taboos limiting cannabis research.
Schedule II drugs are still available to those who need them.
They note that prescribers could no longer phone in prescriptions for these products to pharmacies, electronic prescribing of Schedule II medicines is illegal in some states, and these prescriptions cannot be refilled.
DEA also said that the 90-day limit is the maximum according to its interpretation of congressional intent and the statute covering schedule II controlled substances.
Under the bill, Schedule II controlled substances and other "hot list" drugs would be required to carry a paper pedigree immediately.
Virginia, for example, does not require triplicate forms, but starting this year it will track prescriptions for Schedule II drugs electronically, with a special focus on OxyContin.
This schedule II drug is marketed by Roxane Laboratories of Columbus, Ohio, under the trade name of Marinol (dronabinol).
Add ephedrine and pseudoephedrine to the list of proscribed Schedule II drugs in state Health and Safety Code.
This change is especially important to expedite the delivery of Schedule II medications in time-sensitive cases, where the medications need to be started or changed rapidly in response to patient need.
Oral Transmucosal Fentanyl Citrate (OTFC) contains fentanyl, an opioid agonist and a Schedule II controlled substance, with an abuse liability similar to other opioid analgesics.
today sent a letter urging the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to update regulations and guidance related to the partial filling of Schedule II controlled substances.
They focused on schedule II opioid prescriptions containing oxycodone, fentanyl, hydrocodone, morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, meperidine, codeine, opium, or levorphanol (JAMA Intern Med.