savanna

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Related to Savannas: Savannas Preserve State Park

savanna

a type of habitat occurring in tropical or sub-tropical situations, consisting of grassland and scattered trees. Annual Fig 274
References in periodicals archive ?
As one of the first spirit flavour mixes in the cider category, the Special Release Savanna Loco, with its vibrant turquoise packaging, opens up a new world of upbeat drinking occasions.
With an alcohol content of six percent, Savanna Loco fits in with the rest of the brands cider range.
The elephants in Africa's tropical forests don't reach the size of savanna inhabitants.
Guy McPherson has written a fine, readable book in an attempt to increase our understanding and knowledge of North American savannas.
Over the years, savannas have been known variously as oak openings, oak barrens, and brush prairies.
Without fire, shrubs thrived, and today many former savannas are a tangle of undergrowth beneath tall trees.
Since 1980, South American ranchers have planted roughly 35 million hectares with these varieties because they tap water and nutrients from the poor savanna soils more efficiently than native species.
Our adaptation to the savanna habitat (it was then a bit more wooded and lush than the driedout East Africa of today) enables us to spot the animals wishing to prey upon us soon enough to elude them (by climbing one of those trees) or kill them in self-defense.
A relatively sudden drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide - which favored plants that use carbon dioxide efficiently during energy production sparked the spread of savannas, argued Thure E.
Vrba of Yale University, combined with pollen and oxygen isotope analyses, indicate global cooling caused an expansion of open, grassy savannas in southern and eastern Africa about 2.
An analysis of fossil soils and grasses at a site in southwestern Kenya demonstrates that extensive savannas -- the habitats of early human ancestors--have existed in East Africa for at least the past 14 million years, emerging long before the evolutionary split of apes and hominids.
Some clues may be found in modern African savannas.