aucklandia

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Related to Saussurea: Saussurea costus, Saussurea lappa

aucklandia

Chinese medicine
A herb, the root of which is used in Chinese medicine for gastrointestinal complaints, including anorexia, bloating, diarrhoea, nausea, pain and vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interaction between an isolate of dark-septate fungi and its host plant Saussurea involucrate.
Phylogenetic relationships in Saussurea (Compositae, Cardueae) sensu lato, inferred from morphological, ITS and trnL-trnF sequence data, with a synopsis of Himalaiella gen.
Saussurea weberi is known to have specific flowering phenology and few pollinators (Abbott, 1998; Abbott, 2007; S.
These species were Arisaema jacquemontii, Artemisia japonica, Astragalus candolleanus, Berberis jaeschkeana, Chenopodium album, Convolvulus arvensis, Corydalis govaniana, Jasminum humile, Raphanus sativus, Saussurea costus, Thymus linearis, Annona squamosa, Pupulia lappacea and Drosera peltata.
Bulcsuom Laszlom, glavni pokretac rada u Krugu i neumorni tumac novih metoda u lingvistici, od Saussurea i Ballyja preko Praske fonoloske skole i glosematike do Martinetova funkcionalizma, Jakobsonova binarizma, Bloomfieldova behaviorizma te Sapirove i Whorfove etnolingvistike, a nerijetko je zajedno s prof.
In summer pasture, Kobresia huimlis and Saussurea superba had the highest concentrations of C29 alkane; whilst Gentiana squarrosa and Leontopodium leontopodioides had the highest concentrations of C31 alkane, compared with other species (Table 3).
The solution for saussurea gossypiphora, to give the plant its posh name, is to blow warm air through the snow to melt tunnels for the bees.
Yet a closely related and more common plant, Saussurea medusa, which doesn't attract as many collectors, showed no height differences between the two sites.
Products such as extracts, concretes, and essential oils are obtained from Saussurea lappa (also known as Saussurea costus).
133 The 300 or so species of the genus Saussurea (Asteraceae) grow mainly in the mountains of temperate Asia, although some species also occur in Europe.