Sarcocystis suihominis


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Sarcocystis

 [sahr″ko-sis´tis]
a genus of coccidian protozoa parasitic in birds, reptiles, and mammals, including humans, cattle, horses, sheep, swine, and rabbits and other rodents, occurring as elongated cylindrical bodies (sarcocysts) in the host's muscles. They have an obligatory two-host life cycle, involving sexual reproduction in the definitive host (a carnivore) and asexual reproduction, including schizogony and sarcocyst formation, which occurs in the intermediate host. Infection is transmitted by ingestion of the sporocysts in the feces passed by infected animals. See also sarcocystosis.
Sarcocystis boviho´minis a species for which cattle are the specific intermediate hosts and humans the definitive hosts; it causes intestinal sarcocystosis in humans. It was formerly considered to be combined with S. suihominis in a single species, S. hominis (Isospora hominis).
Sarcocystis lindeman´ni a species causing human infection, most cases of which are asymptomatic, although it may cause polymyositis sometimes associated with eosinophilia.
Sarcocystis suiho´minis a species for which swine are the specific intermediate hosts and humans the definitive hosts; it causes intestinal sarcocystosis in humans. It was formerly considered to form a single species with S. bovihominis, called S. hominis (Isospora hominis).

Sar·co·cys·tis su·i·ho·m'i·nis

a form of Sarcocystis in which humans serve as the final host, with the pig serving as intermediate host, the source of infected tissues to humans. The life cycle and moderate disease induced follow the pattern of Sarcocystis hominis, although the disease appears to be somewhat more pathogenic. Human infection is widespread, having been reported in Europe, the Mediterranean, West Africa, Indonesia, and South America.

Sarcocystis suihominis

A common protozoan of worldwide distribution for which the intermediate hosts are pigs and the definitive hosts humans, as well as chimpanzees and other monkeys.

Epidemiology
S hominis has an obligate two-host life cycle: it causes intestinal infections in humans who have eaten pork from pigs infected by contact with contaminated human faeces containing S hominis sporocysts.
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