Sapir-Whorf hypothesis


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Sapir-Whorf hypothesis

(sə-pîr′wôrf′, -hwôrf′)
n.
A hypothesis holding that the structure of a language affects the perceptions of reality of its speakers and thus influences their thought patterns and worldviews.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is obviously an extreme case of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. Suggesting that there might be a language that could allow an individual to literally break down the walls of causality simply by understanding it is clearly science fiction.
This book reads easily but, at times, it gets repetitive in its dismissal of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. The author makes his point in trying to prove that what structures thought is culture and not language.
To understand the way in which metaphorical frames guide our thinking, it is helpful first to consider a contrasting model, the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. Whorf was a student of Edward Sapir in the 1930s, and absorbed from his mentor both an interest in Native American languages and the conviction that Einstein's principle of relativity had a parallel in the linguistic realm, a sort of relativity of concepts.
Just when ILIL is poised to establish a truly interesting context for its analyses, such as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in Chapter 18, it reverts to cheek--as if, so to speak, to save face.
Kay and their followers versus the relativist view (Sapir-Whorf hypothesis and current adherents).
Then I guess I got caught up in the whole Sapir-Whorf hypothesis stuff--how language structures consciousness and how journalists--or directors--structure reality.
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis has attracted much criticism, especially over the last 15 years, from researchers who regard the mind as a collection of evolved thinking devices that operate independently of language.
In the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology, there is a much-debated theory known as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (Ash, 1999).
To quote: 'Users of markedly different grammars are pointed by their grammars towards different types of observations and different evaluations of externally similar acts of observation, and hence are not equivalent as observers but must arrive at somewhat different views of the world.' (2) Thus Benjamin Whorf (1897-1941), whose name is one part of the duo of linguist and scholar from whose work was developed what is known as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. This hypothesis is a specification of linguistic relativity: it holds that particular languages mould our experience in particular and each time different ways.
As Hart mentions, the thesis that one's thoughts replicate one's language would later be spelled out by the philologist Emile Benveniste (based on the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis).
THE SAPIR-WHORF HYPOTHESIS, developed in the 1930s by the linguists Edward Sapir and Benjamin Lee Whorf, holds that the language we use will determine how we see the world.
Most recently, Usunier (1998) provides an excellent in-depth discussion of language's influence on "world views and attitudes." Hofstede (2001) is quite clear on his support of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis: "Our thinking is affected by the categories and words available in our language" (p.