feverfew

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feverfew

 [fe´ver-fu″]
the dried leaves of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, used for migraine, arthritis, rheumatic diseases, and allergy.

feverfew

/fe·ver·few/ (-fu″) the dried leaves of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, used for migraine, arthritis, rheumatic diseases, and allergy, and for various uses in folk medicine.

feverfew

(fē′vər-fyo͞o′)
n.
An aromatic plant (Tanacetum parthenium syn. Chrysanthemum parthenium) native to Eurasia, having clusters of buttonlike, white-rayed flower heads and used as an herbal medicine primarily to treat migraine headaches.

feverfew

a perennial herb found throughout the world.
uses It is used for migraines, cluster headaches, fever, psoriasis, and inflammation. It is probably safe and effective when used over short terms at recommended levels of migraine prophylaxis and possibly safe for long-term use; it does not abort migraine attacks. There are insufficient reliable data for other uses.
contraindications Chewing the leaves, one of the traditional methods for ingesting the herb, can lead to mouth ulcerations. It should not be used during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fe·ver·few

(fē'vĕr-fyū)
(Chrysanthemum multiflorum) Herbal agent used in migraine headache and fever. Associated with ulceration of oral cavity, labial edema, and hypersensitivity reactions.
Synonym(s): bachelor's button, Santa Maria.
[L. febrifuga, febrifuge]

feverfew,

n Latin names:
Chrysanthemum parthenium, Tanacetum parthenium; part used: leaves; uses: abortifacient, abnormal menstruation, inflamed joints, fever; uses under research: migraines; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; can cause oral ulcers, nausea, and inflammation in muscles and joints. Also called
altamisa, bachelor's button, chamomile grande, featherfew, featherfoil, midsummer daisy, mutterkraut, nosebleed, Santa Maria, wild chamomile, and
wild quinine.

feverfew

tanacetum (Chrysanthemum) parthenium.
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Peter's, the Cappella Paolina in Santa Maria Maggiore, as well as an oversized altarpiece for a transept in the Gesu.
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In 1631 Gomez de Mendoza Manrique appeared in court to oppose his sister, Ines de Velasco, a nun in the convent of Santa Maria de las Huelgas in Valladolid, Spain.

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