sanatorium

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sanatorium

 [san″ah-to´re-um]
an institution for treatment of sick persons, especially a private hospital for convalescents or patients who are not extremely ill; often applied to an institution for the treatment of tuberculosis.

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tō'rē-ŭm), In modern usage this word is virtually synonymous with sanitarium.
An institution for the treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision. Compare: sanitarium.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]

sanatorium

(săn′ə-tôr′ē-əm)
n. pl. sana·toriums or sana·toria (-tôr′ē-ə)
1. An institution for the treatment of chronic diseases or for medically supervised recuperation.
2. A resort for improvement or maintenance of health, especially for convalescents. Also called sanitarium.

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tōr'ē-ŭm)
An institution for the treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tōr'ē-ŭm)
Institution for treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]
References in periodicals archive ?
Henning, Tohoku University, Japan / Saint Vincent College Daily Life, Tuberculosis, and Evangelism: The Omi Sanitorium, 1918-34, Gregory Vanderbilt, University of California at Los Angeles Comment: Barbara Brown Zikmund 2:30-4:30 P.M.
He notes that John Beal Sneed, Fiorina's great-uncle, had his wife committed to a sanitorium when he found out that she was having an affair, and then shot the father of the adulterer.
It was a Hanseatic port in the fourteenth century, and in the mid-nineteenth century emerged as a sanitorium utilizing its mud baths.
One of the sites Hammam was looking at was Sanitorium Road, a stones throw away from Ninian Park.
That experience, too, served as the basis for several stories--"No Pain Whatsoever" and "A Clinical Romance"--of men cloistered together in a sanitorium, awaiting release: to death, to rejection by their lovers, or to the tenuous possibility that life might bestow upon them an unexpected blessing.
In one of his Conversations, Percy also commented on this opening scene: Right now I'm trying to write a novel in which a man finds himself in some sort of cell--it's not clear whether it's a prison cell or a sanitorium cell.
Cannon for the Asolo Conservatory's "The Physicists." Cannon's alternately subdued and haunting lighting set the right tone for scenes in a sanitorium housing some criminally insane scientists.
One can too easily imagine how in a frenetic, fevered frame of mind, Orwell concocted Airstrip One in Oceania from Blitzed-out England, Doublespeak from Communist and BBC propaganda, "young and pretty and sexless" Julia from Sonia Brownell, and Winston Smith's debilitating torture from Orwell's excruciating and futile sanitorium treatments.
This tray may be the work of Guadelupe Arenas, who worked as a laundry woman in a Palm Springs tuberculosis sanitorium. The rattlesnake, a favorite motif on Mission baskets, was viewed as a symbol of power, an avenging spirit, and a protective deity that would bring good fortune to the weaver.
In the midst of his studies at Johns Hopkins he underwent treatment for tuberculosis at the Trudeau Sanitorium in New York, and the experience left him, he said, with a deep appreciation of the importance of attending to the patient, not merely the disease.
Eight years later he founded the Trudeau Sanitorium, world-renowned as a tuberculosis treatment and research center.
Consul Thomas Buddenbrook tells his sister Tony, "You can't get away with that with me." Hans Castorp in The Magic Mountain, just arrived at the sanitorium, wonders with the "leery self-consciousness of youth" if there is derision in Dr.