Richardson

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Related to Samuel Richardson: Henry Fielding

Rich·ard·son

(rich'ărd-sŏn),
John Clifford, 20th-century Canadian neurologist. See: Steele-Richardson-Olszewski disease, Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Maslen, Keith, Samuel Richardson of London, Printer: A Study of His Printing Based on Ornament Use and Business Accounts.
Jane Austen's earliest biographers, her brother and nephew, list Samuel Richardson as her favorite author, and she apparently enjoyed his characters, long-winded plots, melodramatic conflict, and urban romance.
(3) Bonnie Latimer, Making Gender, Culture, and the Self in the Fiction of Samuel Richardson (Surrey: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2013); Helen Thompson, "Secondary Qualities and Masculine Form in Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison" Eighteenth-Century Fiction 24.2 (2012).195-226; Emily Friedman, "The End(s) of Richardson's Sir Charles Grandison" SEL 52.3 (2012):651-67.
It emerges as a spatial figure for Samuel Richardson, whose generic work takes place both in the text (as narrative signposts for different genres) and about the text (as allegorical signposts that expose the discursive interplay among genres in Pamela).
Samuel Richardson's Pamela, not surprisingly, has an assured niche in this volume as it did in Steedman's previous book, but more obscure texts like Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote (1752) and Catherine Thompson's Constance (1833) are also drawn into the discussion and made to yield telling points.
In evidence, Alison Conway offers stimulating concluding chapters on Daniel Defoe's Roxana (1724) and (together) Samuel Richardson's Clarissa (1747-1748) and Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749).
Faulks on Fiction (9.30pm) Sebastian Faulks examines how the characterisation of the villain has evolved in British novels over the past 300 years, from Lovelace in Samuel Richardson''s Clarissa to Barbara in Zoe Heller''s Notes on a Scandal.
Casualty Faulks on Fiction (9.00pm) Sebastian Faulks examines how the characterisation of the villain has evolved in British novels over the past 300 years, from Lovelace in Samuel Richardson''s Clarissa to Barbara in Zoe Heller''s Notes on a Scandal.
Casualty Faulks on Fiction (9.30pm) Sebastian Faulks examines how the characterisation of the villain has evolved in British novels over the past 300 years, from Lovelace in Samuel Richardson''s Clarissa to Barbara in Zoe Heller''s Notes on a Scandal.
Like Clarissa's author Samuel Richardson, Cordelia Strube is a moralist.
Even a brief glimpse at the table of contents is rather awe-inspiring, as it surveys a range of authors, including Samuel Richardson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Herman Melville, Horace Walpole, Pauline Hopkins, Catherine Maria Sedgwick, George Eliot, Nella Larsen, and Virginia Woolf.
In part two, "Founding Fictions of Liberty," Doyle brings together paradigmatic transatlantic literary texts by Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Daniel Defoe, Susanna Rowson, William Hill Brown, Harriet Wilson, Olaudah Equiano, and Herman Melville.