Johnson

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Johnson

 [jon´son]
Dorothy E. Nursing educator and developer of the behavioral system model for nursing. Her chief interest has been in identifying the nature of service provided by nursing and in delineating the knowledge needed to provide that service.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank B., 20th-century U.S. pathologist. See: Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank C., U.S. pediatrician, 1894-1934. See: Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Harry B., U.S. dentist. See: Johnson method.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Treat Baldwin, U.S. chemist, 1875-1947. See: Wheeler-Johnson test.

Johnson, Dorothy E.

Etymology: Dorothy E. Johnson, American nurse, b. 1919 d. 1999
a nursing theorist who developed a behavioral systems model presented in Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (Riehl and Roy, eds., 1973). Johnson's theory addresses two major components: the patient and nursing. The patient is a behavioral system with seven interrelated subsystems. Each subsystem has structural and functional requirements. The structural elements include drive or goal; predisposition to act; choice, alternatives for action; and behavior. The attachment-affiliative subsystem forms the basis for all social organization. The dependency subsystem promotes helping behavior. The biological (ingestive and eliminative) and sexual subsystems have to do with social and psychological functions as well as biological considerations. The function of the achievement subsystem is to attempt to manipulate the environment. The functions of the aggressive subsystem are protection and preservation. Johnson considered that problems in nursing are caused by disturbances in the structure or functions of the subsystems or the system. Her behavioral systems theory provides a conceptual framework for nursing education, practice, and research.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Samuel Johnson Prize recognizes English-language books in the areas of current affairs, history, politics, science, sport, travel, biography, autobiography and the arts.
Among those, Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (1791) is considered to be the most captivating and vigorous of all records.
5) Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed.
Samuel Johnson, autor del libro de viajes Viaje a las Islas occidentales de Escocia (A journey to the Western Islands of Scotland), es considerado por la critica especializada, como bien senala el profesor Agustin Coletes en la introduccion a esta primera edicion en castellano, el segundo autor ingles mas influyente y relevante despues de Shakespeare.
Augustine and Samuel Johnson, for example) not only considered Christianity credible, but gave their life and allegiance to it.
Of course, Purdy is no Samuel Johnson, but his prose leaves no doubt that he hopes to attain the same exalted moral sentiments and lessons--"American power takes a tortuous path and does not always work as we intend.
She excels in close and nuanced re-readings of major eighteenth-century texts, most elaborately with the writings of Daniel Defoe, Edward Long, Samuel Johnson, and Olaudah Equiano, identified as successive benchmarks in the deepening pattern of racial hierarchy.
Samuel Johnson thought Jack the Giant-Killer, Parismus and Parismenus, and The Seven Champions of Christendom 'fitter' for children 'than Mrs.
The special focus of these two volumes is the ongoing debate between those scholars who argue that Samuel Johnson was a Nonjuring Jacobite, and those who interpret his politics in less specifically ideological terms.
Bloom's literary dream team--Shakespeare, Dante, Chaucer, Cervantes, Montaigne, Moliere, Milton, Samuel Johnson, Goethe, Wordsworth, Austen, Whitman, Dickinson, Dickens, George Eliot, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Freud, Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Kafka, Borges, Neruda, Pessoa, Beckett--contains no surprises (except perhaps by omission).
American author and literary biographer known for his studies of the English writers John Keats and Samuel Johnson.
Correspondent D'Errico closed her letter with this engaging thought, her paraphrase of a Samuel Johnson maxim: "A dictionary is like a watch.