sampling

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sampling

 [sam´pling]
the selection or making of a sample.
the selection of a group of people, events, behaviors, or other elements that are representative of the population being studied in order to derive conclusions about the entire population from a limited number of observations.
accidental sampling a type of nonprobability sampling in which the population selected is easily accessible to the researcher; available subjects are simply entered into the study without any attempt at randomization. Called also convenience sampling.
chorionic villus sampling (CVS) sampling of chorionic villi from the villous area of the chorion, a procedure used for prenatal diagnosis at nine to 12 weeks of gestation. A catheter is inserted either through the cervix or through the abdominal wall and fetal chorionic villus tissue for analysis is aspirated under ultrasonic guidance. This has been used for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomies, hemoglobinopathies, and biochemical disorders. It allows first trimester diagnosis and direct chromosomal and biochemical analysis but does not screen for neural tube defects or certain other anomalies; some of those may be identified by maternal serum and amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein measurements.
A diagram of the technique of transvaginal chorionic villus sampling. From Mueller and Young, 2001.
cluster sampling a type of probability sampling in which the population is divided into groups on the basis of some shared characteristic (such as hospitals grouped by geographic region) and a random sample is drawn from each of these groups.
convenience sampling accidental sampling.
nonprobability sampling sampling in which not every element of the population has an opportunity of being selected for the sample; the sample is not representative of the population and generalizations cannot be made to the population.
percutaneous umbilical blood sampling a procedure used to obtain fetal blood for examination; a sterile needle is inserted through the mother's abdomen and uterus, and guided to one of the umbilical veins via ultrasound. This procedure has begun to replace fetoscopy because it has a lower complication rate. Direct sampling of fetal blood provides more rapid test results than amniocentesis, and a more definitive diagnosis. It can be used to identify chromosomal abnormalities, detect a fetal infection, and assess fetal growth and development. Called also cordocentesis.
Percutaneous umbilical cord sampling, also known as cordocentesis. The needle is advanced through the skin and into the uterus. Once the needle punctures the umbilical cord and one of the uterine veins, cord blood is aspirated by the syringe. From Malarkey and McMorrow, 2000.
probability sampling sampling in which each element of a population has an opportunity of being selected for the sample; its purpose is to obtain a sample that is representative of the population and from which generalizations to the population can be made.
purposive sampling a type of nonprobability sampling in which the researcher consciously selects specific elements or subjects for inclusion in a study in order to ensure that the elements will have certain characteristics relevant to the study.
quota sampling a type of nonprobability sampling in which an accidental sample is adjusted to ensure that certain subgroups are not underrepresented; its purpose is to obtain a sample that is representative of the population to which the researcher wishes to make generalizations.
random sampling probability sampling.
stratified random sampling sampling in which the population is divided into several groups that are alike in certain ways and a random selection is made from each group.
systematic sampling the selection of study objects conducted when an ordered list of all members of the population is available; subjects are chosen from the list at a given uniform interval from each other, using a starting point that is selected randomly.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sam·pling

(sam'pling),
The policy of inferring the behavior of a whole batch by studying a fraction of it.
[MF essample, fr. L. exemplum, taking out]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sampling

An MRI term for the conversion of analog signals to discrete digital values through a preselected measurement process.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sampling

Statistics The obtaining of representative material from a population Surgery A procedure that obtains a soupçon of material for pathologic evaluation, without a formal attempt at complete removal of a suspected or confirmed lesion. See Cluster sampling, Inferior petrosal sinus sampling.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sam·pling

(sam'pling)
The policy of inferring the behavior of a whole batch by studying a fraction of it.
[MF essample, fr. L. exemplum, taking out]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sampling

  1. the act of taking a fraction of substance to be tested or analysed.
  2. the selection of some parts from a larger whole as in statistical sampling.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sampling 

The selection of a group of subjects from a population. This is usually done for the purpose of experimentation. The part of the population selected is called the sample: it is usually considered to be representative of a given population. A good sample must be random, i.e. every possible member of that population has an equal chance of being selected. Otherwise, it is said to be biased. Sampling can extend either across geographical areas (spatial sampling) or over a period of time (temporal sampling).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Interpolation, or up sampling, translates a low sample rate modulated signal into a much higher sample rate signal that is ready for up conversion.
Modern high-speed Arbs with sample rates as fast as 4 GS/s and high-linearity 8-b DACs show SFDR around 65 dB for 10-MHz carriers and about 45 dB for 400-MHz carriers.
The ability of deep memory scopes to achieve high sample rates and long time capture simultaneously is important due to the types of signals commonly encountered in today's designs.
The internal sample rate converters on the new Dante cards were developed in-house.
The delay depends on the number of new TCP connections established by the host and the sample rate used for sFlow.
At a sample rate of 10 SPS the error at all pulsation frequencies was within about [+ or -]0.5%.
Sample rate: Florence from pounds 695pp (five-star Villa Mangiacane) Street celebrations in Portugal are the highlight during Easter week and these culminate with bonfires and the burning of straw dolls on Good Friday.
Customers can also use TI's TSW1200 digital capture tool for rapid evaluation of ADCs of up to 16-bit resolution and 500-MSPS sample rates to further speed development time.
Models TEC-4300, TEC-8300, TEC-9300 and TEC-2500 feature universal sensor input, fast sample rate, fuzzy logic PID autotuning control, 2-4 independently programmable outputs/alarms, universal power input, heater break alarm, bumpless transfer to manual mode, analog retransmission and NEMA 4X/IP65 front faces.
Texas Instruments has announced a 13-bit, 210MSPS analog-to-digital converter (ADC) featuring 68dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and 79dB spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR), at the maximum sample rate of 210MSPS and an input frequency of 230MHz.
All six models offer a 2 GS/sec maximum sample rate with a 250 msec capture time at full sample rate.
When coupled with the rate-converter core, they allow a channel bank to be configured that exactly matches the required output spacing and sample rate. As an example, in a recent design that required 1,872 channels to be precisely extracted from a spectrum bandwidth in excess of 40 MHz, two-point, three-point, and 13-point DFT cores were integrated to produce this exact length FFT.