biased sample

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biased sample

[bī′əst]
Etymology: OFr, biais, slant; L, exemplum, sample
(in research) a sample of a group in which all factors or participants are not equally balanced or objectively represented.

biased sample

A subset of a population that does not represent—either intentionally or unintentionally—an entire population.

biased sample

In epidemiology or medical research, a sample of a group that does not equally represent the members of the group.
See also: sample
References in periodicals archive ?
Some methods are flexible enough that they underestimate the severity of business cycles while others are so trend dominated that their estimates are subject to end sample bias.
Finally, the third issue is related to the significance of measuring the strength of belief of luck concept, rather than the sample bias.
Include questions designed to identify sample bias.
They report a significant sample bias that may have been the source of algorithm failure.
First, one can readily raise the question of sample bias and the limited generalizability of their conclusions; much of the work ultimately depends upon interviews with 52 men selected from an original sample of 500 white men from the Boston area born in the 1920s and early 1930s.
A 3-mm diameter, circular skin punch biopsy specimen is sliced into about 60 sections, 4 of which are randomly selected for analysis to reduce sample bias because there may be differences in nerve density in different parts of the specimen.
A 3-mm diameter, circular skin punch biopsy specimen (about half the size of a pencil eraser) is sliced into about 60 sections, 4 of which are randomly selected for analysis to reduce sample bias since there may be differences in nerve density in different parts of the specimen.
Among these enhancements, the correction of the standardized effects for the small sample bias of the standard deviation stands out as an important advance.
Writing objective questions, participation bias, sample bias, etc.
Each estimate would be subject to small sample bias (Greenland 2000), which was cited by Farmer et al.
Crouch raises four kinds of problems for them: definition problem, sample bias, reporting bias, and researcher bias.