chia

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CHIA

Abbreviation for:
Comprehensive Health Impact Assessment (Medspeak-UK)

chia

(che'a) [Sp. chía, fr Nahuatl (Aztec) chian, oily]
A member of the sage family of grains, Salvia hispanica. It is a rich nutritional source of amino acids and alpha-linoleic acid and has been proposed as an appetite suppressant. Synonym: salba
References in periodicals archive ?
The seed's protein and oil content, fatty acid composition, and growing cycle length of a single genotype of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) as affected by environmental factors.
Dietary fibre content and antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds present in Mexican chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds.
[6.] Segura-campos MR, Ciau-solis N, Rosado-rubio L, Chel-guerrero L and D Betancur-ancona Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum," Int.
Valdivia-Lopez, "Dietary fibre content and antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds present in Mexican chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds," Food Chemistry, vol.
Caracterizacion de la semilla y aceite de chia (Salvia hispanica L.) obtenido mediante distintos procesos: aplicacion y tecnologia de alimentos.
Dietary chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) rich in alpha-linolenic acid improves adiposity and normalises hypertriacyl glycerolaemia and insulin resistance in dyslipaemic rats.
Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) enhances HSP, PGC-1alpha expressions and improves glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese rats.
Chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) possess the highest concentration of omega fatty acids; it contains about 60% omega-3 fatty acids on weight basis [6].
Dietary chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) rich in alpha-linolenic acid improves adiposity and normalizes hypertriacylglycerolaemia and insulin resistance in dyslipaemic rats.
The researchers started by grinding seeds from Salvia hispanica to obtain flour granules with a size of 1 mm to 2 mm.
Chia seeds (Salvia hispanica) appear natively in both Mexico and Guatemala, although they are now also cultivated in Australia, Bolivia, Argentina and Ecuador.(1) They typically appear as small ovals with a diameter of 1 mm and are mottle-coloured with brown, gray, black and white with a mildly nutty flavour.