Salvia divinorum


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Salvia divinorum

A psychoactive plant native to the cloud forest of Oaxaca, Mexico, which has long been used by shamans to induce visions during healing. The plant owes it dissociative effects to salvinorum A, which differs structurally from other natural hallucinogens and acts on the kappa opioid receptor. It has a low toxicity (high LD50) and minimal addictive potential.

Salvia divinorum

A species native to Mexico, chewed or smoked for its euphoric and hallucinogenic effects.
See also: Salvia
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Furthermore, the DEA states that Salvia divinorum will probably not become a "club drug." It notes that users generally become introspective and introverted, two states of consciousness that are not typically associated with rave culture (DEA 2003).
"When people come into my shop looking for Salvia Divinorum we are very strict about who we sell it to and every buyer has to be over 21.
The detection and quantitative analysis of the psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum, Salvinorin A, in human biological fluids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.
Morning glory seeds, like Salvia divinorum, may also be purchased on the Internet, but, unlike Salvia, have not been criminalized.
Andy Olson, R-Albany, a sponsor of HB 3131, showed committee members two such videos in his Thursday testimony before urging them to adopt the bill which would make it illegal in Oregon to sell or give Salvia divinorum to people under the age of 21.
Salvia divinorum is a hallucinogenic plant that has gained increased interest as a recreational substance among youth and young adults.
Bottom line: The use and even just the possession of 'Spice,' herbal products, designer drugs, chemicals used for huffing, salvia divinorum or products containing synthetic cannabinoid compounds are prohibited.
In what is believed to be the first controlled human study of the effects of salvinorin A, the active ingredient in Salvia divinorum, a controversial new hallucinogen featured widely on You Tube and other internet sites, Johns Hopkins researchers report that the effects are surprisingly strong, brief, and intensely disorienting, but without apparent short-term adverse effects in healthy people.
Schuchs-Gopaul, a judge advocate with the Air Force Judge Advocate General Action Group, recently explained that the guidance specifically named the designer drug salvia divinorum, known as spice, inhalants, household chemicals, solvents and prescription drugs.
In recent years, the drug Salvia divinorum, or Salvia, has gained the attention of state legislators.