Salter-Harris fracture


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Salt·er-Har·ris frac·ture

(sawl'tĕr-har'is frak'shŭr)
Classification of epiphysial fracture types 1-5.
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SALTER-HARRIS FRACTURE: I: Fracture Extends through the physis, separating the two segments; Common in infants
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SALTER-HARRIS FRACTURE: II: Fracture starts though the physis and ends on the shaft, creating a displaced wedge
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SALTER-HARRIS FRACTURE: III: The fracture line extends perpendicularly through the joint surface and then transversely across the physis, resulting in partial displacement of the segment. Growth of the involved physis may be compromised.
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SALTER-HARRIS FRACTURE: IV: Similar to type III fracture, but the transverse line extends across the physis into the shaft. Surgical fixation is often required and physeal growth may be affected
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SALTER-HARRIS FRACTURE: V: A crushing injury that compresses the physis. If undetected, avascular necrosis may occur and growth may be inhibited

Salter-Harris fracture

(săl′tĕr-hăr′ĭs)
A classification system used to categorize growth plate fractures as one of five types based on the mechanism of injury and the relationship of the fracture line(s) to the epiphyseal plate. The original five types of fractures, since expanded by other authors, were type I—a transverse fracture across the physis; type II—a fracture through the physis and metaphysis but not the epiphysis; type III—a fracture through the physis and epiphysis; type IV—an intra-articular fracture involving the epiphysis, physis, and metaphysis and type V—a compression on the epiphyseal plate.
See: illustration
References in periodicals archive ?
Known as Salter-Harris fractures, these injuries can stunt bone growth or cause improper development.
Type I Salter-Harris fractures involve the entire physis but do not extend into the adjacent epiphysis or metaphysis.
Growth arrests occur many times more frequently in the lower extremities despite the fact that Salter-Harris fractures are more common in the upper extremities.