marram grass

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marram grass

Ammophila arenaria, a grass found on coastal sand dunes. It is a XEROPHYTE that is capable of rolling its leaves to prevent water loss in dry conditions. It has deeply running stems (RHIZOMES) and roots that bind the sand in the dunes and thus is often planted to stabilize dune systems.
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student supervised by Kellogg and Olsen, and Ivan Baxter, Ph.D., USDA research scientist and associate member at the Danforth Center, to study the highly salt-tolerant grass to improve turf varieties.
Salt-tolerant grass, called halophytes, produced for golf courses or forage for cattle and camels, are the focus of modern farming techniques being developed by the Faculty of Food and Agriculture at UAE University in Al Ain to save water.
Optimizing management practices for maximum production of two salt-tolerant grasses: Sporobolus Virginicus and Distichlis Spicata.
These controls include the shallow flooding of thousands of acres along the eastern edge of the lake with a small percentage of the water that is diverted, as well as reclaiming some of the saline lakebed soils and establishing fields of salt-tolerant grass irrigated with hi-tech buried drip systems.