saliva

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saliva

 [sah-li´vah]
the enzyme-containing secretion of the salivary glands.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă),
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in a measure, to convert starch into maltose, the latter action being effected by a diastatic enzyme, ptyalin.
Synonym(s): spittle
[L. akin to G. sialon]

saliva

(sə-lī′və)
n.
The watery mixture of secretions from the salivary and oral mucous glands that lubricates chewed food, moistens the oral walls, and contains ptyalin.

saliva

Spit The clear, semifluid secretion of the major and minor salivary glands, and mucus-secreting cells of the oral cavity; saliva keeps the oral cavity moist, lubricates food during mastication–which facilitates deglutition, and, via its enzyme content-alpha amylase, begins the process of digestion. See Salivary glands, Sputum.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acid (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretions from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and to convert starch into maltose.
Synonym(s): spittle.
[L. akin to G. sialon]

saliva

A slightly alkaline, watery fluid secreted into the mouth by the SALIVARY GLANDS. Saliva contains the digestive enzyme amylase capable of breaking down starch to simpler sugars. Saliva keeps the mouth moist, dissolves taste particles in food so that they can stimulate the taste buds on the tongue and lubricates food during mastication to assist in swallowing.

saliva

a viscous, transparent liquid containing water, salts, MUCIN and (sometimes) salivary AMYLASE. Saliva is secreted by cells of the salivary glands which, in humans, occur in three pairs, one in the cheek and two between the bones of the lower jaw. The quantity of saliva produced depends on the type of food being consumed. Dry foods and acidic foods stimulate a copious volume of nonviscous saliva, while liquids such as milk stimulate small quantities of thick saliva.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
Clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of oral cavity; its function is to keep mucous membrane of mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in some measure, to convert starch into maltose.
[L. akin to G. sialon]
References in periodicals archive ?
Chen et al., "Variability assessment of 90 salivary proteins in intraday and interday samples from healthy donors by multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry," Proteomics.
(38) The calibration curve was obtained by the density reduction of two protein bands selected from the pool of salivary proteins that were better correlated with sensory analysis.
Keywords: Salivary protein, Caries, Poly- g-glutamic acid, Statherin
Implication of haematophagous arthropod salivary proteins in host-vector interactions.
Temporal and compositional characteristics of salivary protein adsorption to hydroxyapatite.
ovallesi revealed similarity between salivary proteins, showing 11 prominent protein bands with molecular weights between 16 and 99 kDa.
Recent evidences indicate that some of the salivary proteins can interact specifically with microorganisms [36].
By comparing the projected incidence using the Lyme disease transmission model to actual incidence of Lyme disease, we could assess the overall importance of factors missing from the basic model, such as the effects of inflammatory reactions against tick salivary proteins and acquired immunity to the spirochetal pathogen.
The allowed claims include compositions of matter for variations of naturally occurring human histidine-rich salivary proteins called histatins that are made with one or more D-amino acids.
Rodents and rabbits which routinely prefer and consume high-tannin plant foods, on the other hand, secrete salivary proteins which are proline-rich and bind the tannins so that they do not interfere with digestion (25).
Using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, the team identified several salivary proteins that differed between those who could readily detect salt and those who couldn't.